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Background

I'm loading and executing a script from another server (cross domain) via jQuery's .ajax(...) call.

There is a bit of code that needs to be executed after the code from the other server has been executed, because otherwise some objects are 'undefined', yet.

Maybe important: The remote code does contain another getScript(...) call. And I have to wait for this code to be executed as well. I cannot simply load this second script from my code, because its source is dynamic (i.e. depends on some results of the remote script).

Did not work: success callback

Apparently, a success callback is called after the remote code is laoded, but before the remote code is executed.

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$.getScript("http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js")
.success(executeLater)  # this gets executed when the remote script is loaded,
                        # but before the remote script is executed.

Did not work: async: false

Apparently, the async attribute is ignored for cross-domain requests, as stated here in the jQuery documentation: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/#jQuery-ajax-settings

Furthermore, I would like to avoid the async: false setting, because it is said to block the browser.

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$.ajax(
  dataType: 'script',
  url: 'http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js',
  async: false   # does not work because the request is cross domain
)
.success(executeLater)

Did not work: $.when(...).then(...)

Using jQuery's when-then mechanism, apparently, the then code is executed before the when block is executed.

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$.when( $.ajax(
  dataType: 'script',
  url: 'http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js',
) ).then(executeLater)

EDIT: Did work, but unusable: ajax both scripts

I can't do this in production, as I said above in the 'background' section, but if I reduce all cases to one and load the second script, which is usually executed by the remote script, in my own script, all works fine.

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$.getScript("http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js")
.success( ->
  $.ajax(
    dataType: 'script',
    cache: true,
    # I do not know this url in production:
    url: 'http://example.com/another-script-from-the-remote-server.js'  
  )
  .success(executeLater)
)

Things to avoid

I would hate to use constructions like a couple of setTimout calls until a certain object is defined an the execute the executeLater() method.

What I need: A executed callback

It would be perfect to use a kind of executed callback rather than the success callback of the ajax method. But, so far, I haven't found this callback.

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$.ajax(
  dataType: 'script',
  url: 'http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js',
  executed: executeLater  # <---- I NEED A CALLBACK LIKE THIS
)

Any clues?

Does anyone know how I can execute the executeLater method after the remote code has been executed? Thanks!

EDIT: Same-origin policy

As adeneo pointed out in the comments section, JavaScript's same-origin policy might be the problem.

The script, which I load with an ajax or getScript call is not allowed to load and execute another script from a remote server in order to prevent a malicious script from "calling home".

This is supported by the following experiment:

This doesn't work:

<html><head>
  <script language="javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
  <script language="javascript">
    jQuery.getScript("http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js")
  </script>
</head><body></body></html>

This works:

According to this stackexchange answer, the same-origin policy allows remote scripts that are loaded by an html <script> tag to load other remote scripts via ajax.

<html><head>
  <script language="javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
  <script language="javascript" src="http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js"></script>
</head><body></body></html>

The question remains: Is there a good way to do it with an ajax call, or, do I have to "prove" that I "own this code" by inserting a <script> tag in to the html document?

share|improve this question
    
That's a really nicely formatted question, but the big question is still, are you sure javascripts same-origin policy isn't the issue ? –  adeneo Sep 12 '13 at 22:42
    
@adeneo : I'm not sure, how can I find out? I've just added the section "Did work, but unusable: ajax both scripts". Does this answer your question? –  fiedl Sep 12 '13 at 23:01
    
@adeneo : I looks like you were right: The SOP might be the problem. Please have a look at the 'EDIT: Same-origin policy' section. What do you think? –  fiedl Sep 13 '13 at 14:52
    
As you said... you may have to add the script to your dom element to overcome the SOP issue... but still the second issue remains... which is to fire a handler when the dynamic script loading is completed –  Arun P Johny Sep 13 '13 at 16:32
    
Will you be able to make some changes to the first dynamic script element –  Arun P Johny Sep 13 '13 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

Background

adeneo's suggestion to consider JavaScripts Same-Origin Policy (see comments to the question) did solve my problem.

Where the question assumes that the success callback is called before the requested script is fully executed, the real problem is, that the requested script does request another script, as stated in the question:

Maybe important: The remote code does contain another getScript(...) call. And I have to wait for this code to be executed as well. I cannot simply load this second script from my code, because its source is dynamic (i.e. depends on some results of the remote script).

When the requested script is loaded dynamically, this second getScript call is prevented by JavaScript's same-origin policy.

Solution 1: Include the script in the html code

If one has access to the html files, one can add a script tag with the remote script as src. Thereby, one "proves" that one really wants to load this remote script and javascript will execute the remote getScript call.

<html><head>
  ...
  <script language="javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.2.js"></script>
  <script language="javascript" src="http://example.com/script-from-other-server.js"></script>
</head><body></body></html>

In order to execute the executeLater code, one can simply use a ready callback:

# coffee script

executeLater = ->
  # this bit of code needs to run after the remote code has been executed.
  console.log("yehaa!")

$(document).ready(executeLater)

Solution 2: Circumvent some-origin policy

This is not recommended, but possible. There is a popular stack overflow question how to get around the same-origin policy:

Ways to circumvent the same-origin policy

Solution 3: Really wait for the script to be executed

If, in addition to the same-origin policy, the remote script really takes so long to be executed that the local script has to wait for it, one can use Ahmed Nuaman's iframe solution:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/18793000/2066546

share|improve this answer

This is a bit nasty but have you tried using an iframe? The idea is simple:

  1. Have a form with the action and method appropriate for the request you're trying to make.
  2. Set the target (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/form) of the form to point to an iframe on your page, this iframe can be hidden.
  3. Listen to the onload of the iframe and when the iframe has loaded you can execute your code.

So here's a small example (uses jQuery):

<form id="xform" action="http://foo.bar/foo/bar" method="get" target="xiframe">
  <input type="text" name="foo" value="bar" />
</form>
<iframe name="xiframe" id="xiframe"></iframe>
<script>
  var form = $('#xform'),
      iframe = $('#xiframe');

  iframe.load(function () {
    // run your stuff here
  });

  form.submit();
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for suggesting this fix. As I understand it, it really allows to wait for a script to be executed rather than to be just successfully loaded. But, as adeneo has suggested in the comment section above, the real problem was that I didn't account for the js single-origin policy. Correcting for this (by including a script tag into the html structure directly) did solve my problem. ... –  fiedl Sep 15 '13 at 19:56
    
Now, I'm not sure how to properly proceed in stackoverflow. Do I accept your answer (because it probably answers my question correctly) or do I ask adeneo to submit an answer (because he did identify my underlaying problem in a comment)? Thanks! –  fiedl Sep 15 '13 at 19:57
    
Whatever tickles your fancy! –  Ahmed Nuaman Sep 16 '13 at 19:56

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