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I'm trying to prevent multiple requests when user click on login or register button. This is my code, but it doesn't work. Just the first time works fine, then return false..

$('#do-login').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    if ( $(this).data('requestRunning') ) {
        return;
    }

    $(this).data('requestRunning', true);

    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "/php/auth/login.php",
        data: $("#login-form").serialize(),
        success: function(msg) {
            //stuffs
        },
        complete: function() {
            $(this).data('requestRunning', false);
        }
    });      
}); 

Any ideas? Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

Use on() and off(), that's what they are there for :

$('#do-login').on('click', login);

function login(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var that = $(this);
    that.off('click'); // remove handler
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "/php/auth/login.php",
        data: $("#login-form").serialize()
    }).done(function(msg) {
        // do stuff
    }).always(function() {
        that.on('click', login); // add handler back after ajax
    });
}); 
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Thanks! Joe's solution works fine. but this other way to get the same result. Which is the best solution? –  mauriblint Sep 12 '13 at 22:52
    
@adeneo's solution is better. –  Joe Frambach Sep 12 '13 at 22:53
    
@JoeFrambach - thanks, but it's a matter of preference really, there's nothing wrong with setting a flag in data(), but this does seem like just what on() and off() was meant to do, add and remove event handlers ? –  adeneo Sep 12 '13 at 22:56
    
So, i've a problem, i cannot accept two anwers!! :( haha –  mauriblint Sep 12 '13 at 22:57
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The problem is here:

    complete: function() {
        $(this).data('requestRunning', false);
    }

this no longer points to the button.

$('#do-login').click(function(e) {
    var me = $(this);
    e.preventDefault();

    if ( me.data('requestRunning') ) {
        return;
    }

    me.data('requestRunning', true);

    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "/php/auth/login.php",
        data: $("#login-form").serialize(),
        success: function(msg) {
            //stuffs
        },
        complete: function() {
            me.data('requestRunning', false);
        }
    });      
}); 
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You can disable the button.

$(this).prop('disabled', true);
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In you ajax callbacks the context (this) changes from the outer function, you can set it to be the same by using the context property in $.ajax

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/php/auth/login.php",
    data: $("#login-form").serialize(),
    context: this, //<-----
    success: function(msg) {
        //stuffs
    },
    complete: function() {
        $(this).data('requestRunning', false);
    }
});      
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