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I have a method dummy with A as class parameter, but i need to pass instance of subclasses B to that method. I know from: Does Java casting introduce overhead? Why? that downcasting in java have overhead. Most of my code deal with subclass B so i dont use downcasting for this purpose. Instead i use temporal instance variable cc for that purpose. But this is not make a change for object of subclass m. I need change in variable cc avaliable too for instance variable m. This is my code:

public class TestCast {

    public TestCast() {
        B m = new B(12, 3);
        dummy(m);
        A cc = m;
        dummy(cc);
        System.out.println(m.a);
        System.out.println(cc.a);
    }

    public void dummy(A t) {
        t.a = 22222;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestCast();
    }
}

class A {
    public int a = 0;

    public A(int a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
}

class B extends A {

    public int a;
    public int b;

    public B(int a, int b) {
        super(a);
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }
}

with output

12
22222
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4 Answers 4

In your particular example, both the parent and child classes declared a field with name a. In this case, the child variable hides the parent variable.

Also, variables/fields are not polymorphic entities like methods. They are accessed by the static type of a reference.

In other words, the field access

A var = new A(10);
var.a; // returns 10

And the field access

A var = new B(1501, 10); 
var.a; // also returns 10

but

A var = new B(1501, 10); 
var.a; // returns 10
((B)var).a; // returns 1501

because you access a on a reference with static type B.

In your method

public void dummy(A t) {
    t.a = 22222;
}

The static type of t is A so you will modify the value of the parent class variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, what you mean with term static in your answer. I try your suggestion in my PC, but it doesn't work. I mean A a = new A(12) return 12, but a = new B(23,23) will return 23. –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 10:49
    
@pisang_ijo Consider reading this tutorial on static vs dynamic binding. For starters, don't pass the same value to your B constructor, it'll be harder to tell which you are getting. Then, do exactly what I did in my answer to see the difference. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 13 '13 at 12:26
    
OK i understand now what Is the difference between static and dynamic binding. But for my question above, what is the conclusion, is casting like A cc = m created new Object or what? What is the purpose of = operator in that statement. –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 18:31
    
@pisang_ijo You are not creating a new object with that statement. You are assigning a reference of type B that holds an instance B to a variable declared with type A. So the variable cc will point to the object referenced by m. This is valid because B extends from A. However, on cc you cannot call methods of class B without casting it because the type A doesn't declare such methods. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 13 '13 at 18:33
    
Sorry, in my code above: B m = new B(12,3); dummy(m); will not change state variable m. A cc = (A) m; dummy(cc); change state variable cc but not change state variable m. and then statement like cc.a == m.a will false. So what you mean with "So the variable cc will point to the object referenced by m" –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 18:44

Casting is telling the compiler that a reference variable is of specific Type at runtime

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can you give a litle suggestion how to complete my task? –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 2:46
    
@user2014314, I'm a little bit confused with your words, can you please be more concrete and cleare? –  Prasad Kharkar Sep 13 '13 at 2:48
    
i mean inside class TestCasting there area many method that require Subclass B. But just one method (i.e dummy) require supertype A. I avoid to create instance like A a = new B() because when deal with method that needed object with type B, i must use downcasting. And that make many overhead. –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 2:55
    
@user2014314, I think Sotirios Delimanolis answer gives the reason why you can't do it. and don't worry about the performance. –  Prasad Kharkar Sep 13 '13 at 3:03

Because B is extending A you do not want to re-define the variable a

In answer to your comment, you code should be something like:

class B extends A {

   public int b;

   public B(int a, int b) {
    super(a);
    this.b = b;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Most of my code deal with type class B. So when I create instance like B b = new B(12,4), and in following line I execute statement like System.out.println(b.b), output will be 0. So that is required to initialize variable a and b inside contructor of class B. –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 3:16

IMO, your example code is not perfect implementation of inheritance. Inheritance enables you re-usability of code. In other words, you don't need to declare int a again in class B.

I need change in variable cc avaliable too for instance variable m:

However, if you want to change in variable cc as well, then declare variables a, b as private/protected in both A and B. And provide setters and getters in both classes. And in class B call super.setA(a) like below.

class B extends A {

    private int a;
    private int b;

    public B(int a, int b) {
        super(a);
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }

    public setA(int a) {
        super.setA(a);
        this.a = a;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but when related with my question how casting work in java, can you give me some explanation why in my code above the field of m not changed simultaneously when the field of cc changed. –  fajar66 Sep 13 '13 at 11:02

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