Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently I interviewed at a multi-national corporation, where I was asked to explain the difference between an "Interface" and an "Abstract class".

This is a question I prepared for before the interview. Here's how I answered:

Main difference is methods of a Java interface are implicitly abstract and cannot have implementations. A Java abstract class can have instance methods that implements a default behavior.

Variables declared in a Java interface is by default final. An abstract class may contain non-final variables.

Members of a Java interface are public by default. A Java abstract class can have the usual flavors of class members like private, protected, etc..

Java interface should be implemented using keyword “implements”; A Java abstract class should be extended using keyword “extends”.

An interface can extend another Java interface only, an abstract class can extend another Java class and implement multiple Java interfaces.

A Java class can implement multiple interfaces but it can extend only one abstract class.

However, the interviewer was not satisfied, and told me that this description represented "book knowledge".

He asked me for a more practical response, explaining when I would choose an abstract class over an interface, using practical examples.

Where did I go wrong?

share|improve this question
12  
Maybe your answer looked like you are telling something that you do not understand? It can be that you simply need to change the style of telling to the one that more looks like your own words. –  Kirill Kobelev Sep 13 '13 at 3:54
    
Did you give an example? –  techuser Sep 13 '13 at 3:55
    
Yes. I told him example of Runnable and thread –  Thinker Sep 13 '13 at 3:58
6  
You answered with a list of (quite correct) technical differences. Interviewer was most likely looking for a more conceptual answer (e.g., on what basis would one choose between using an interface and an abstract class). –  Ted Hopp Dec 30 '13 at 20:38
1  
You forgot to say that abstract classes have constructors, even though you cannot instantiate an abstract class, the const. is used by child classes. Interfaces indicate "what" but not "how" because they define a contract (list of methods) while an abst. class can also indicate "how" (implement a meth.). Using int. you can emulate multiple inheritance (a class can implement multiple int. but only extend one class). Using int. you can have a base type for dif. families: Flyer f=new Plane();Flyer f2=new Bird(); Bird and Plane don't correspond to the same familiy but both can fly (are flyers). –  Francisco Goldenstein Aug 5 '14 at 15:24

18 Answers 18

I will give you an example first:

public interface LoginAuth{
   public String encryptPassword(String pass);
   public void checkDBforUser();
}

Now suppose you have 3 databases in your application. Then each and every implementation for that database needs to define the above 2 methods:

public class DBMySQL implements LoginAuth{
          // Needs to implement both methods
}
public class DBOracle implements LoginAuth{
          // Needs to implement both methods
}
public class DBAbc implements LoginAuth{
          // Needs to implement both methods
}

But what if encryptPassword() is not database dependent, and it's the same for each class? Then the above would not be a good approach.

Instead, consider this approach:

public abstract class LoginAuth{
   public String encryptPassword(String pass){
            // Implement the same default behavior here 
            // that is shared by all subclasses.
   }

   // Each subclass needs to provide their own implementation of this only:
   public abstract void checkDBforUser();
}

Now in each child class, we only need to implement one method - the method that is database dependent.

I tried my best and Hope this will clear your doubts.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for this answer, good approach. –  Denees Aug 19 '14 at 19:16
    
Nice explanation! –  Shailesh Saxena Oct 1 '14 at 4:46
    
Nice example :) –  Vishal Zanzrukia Dec 16 '14 at 9:20
2  
I'm not sure this really explains the difference... sure it's a nice technique. I suppose it's also worth pointing out that Java 8 has finally admitted that C++ was right and that multiple inheritance can be done and can have a use and so interfaces can now define not just function signatures but also provide default implementations. As such, using an interface would be preferable. –  thecoshman Feb 24 at 14:10

Nothing is perfect in world. They might be expecting something with practical approach.

But after your explanation you could add these lines with slightly different approach.

  1. Interfaces are rules (Rules because you must give an implementation to them and that you can't ignore or avoid, so that are imposed like rules) which works as a common understanding document among the various teams in software development.

  2. Interfaces give the idea what is to be done but not how it will be done. So
    implementation completely depends on developer by following the given rules(Means given signature of methods).

  3. Abstract classes may contain only abstract declarations or only concrete implementations or mixed.

  4. Abstract declarations are like rules to be followed and concrete implementations are like guidelines(You can use that as it is or you can ignore it by overriding and giving your own choice implementation to it).

  5. Moreover which methods with same signature may change the behaviour in different context are provided as interface declarations as rules to implement accordingly in different contexts.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1, this is really a good answer to avoid the confusion. But I didn't see any link and no idea why you quoted those valuable lines. Make them as points if possible :). –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Feb 26 '14 at 5:19
    
Read my comment above about emulating multiple inheritance using interfaces and using interfaces for having a base type for classes of different families. I think that the interviewer wants to hear that kind of answers from the interviewed. –  Francisco Goldenstein Aug 5 '14 at 15:28
    
Your comment also points to a good example use of interface. I wrote, what I feel while working day to day. These words may not be professional or accurate. But its what I came to know after working closely with abstract classes & interfaces in my daily coding. –  Shailesh Saxena Aug 6 '14 at 4:40
    
4. Concrete implementations are also the rules, having the default implementation. –  Luten Sep 25 '14 at 12:25

You made a good summery of the practical differences in use and implementation but did not say anything about the difference in meaning.

An interface is a description of the behaviour an implementing class will have. The implementing class ensures, that it will have these methods that can be used on it. It is basically a contract or a promise the class has to make.

An abstract class is a basis for different subclasses that share behaviour which does not need to be repeatedly be created. Subclasses must complete the behaviour and have the option to override predefine behaviour (as long as it is not defined as final or private).

You will find good examples in the java.util package which includes interfaces like List and abstract classes like AbstractList which already implements the interface. The official documentation describes the AbstractList as follows:

This class provides a skeletal implementation of the List interface to minimize the effort required to implement this interface backed by a "random access" data store (such as an array).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for being the thing that I needed. –  George Netu Mar 17 '14 at 9:28

Your explanation looks decent, but may be it looked like you were reading it all from a textbook? :-/

What I'm more bothered about is, how solid was your example? Did you bother to include almost all the differences between abstract and interfaces?

Personally, I would suggest this link: http://mindprod.com/jgloss/interfacevsabstract.html#TABLE

for an exhaustive list of differences..

Hope it helps you and all other readers in their future interviews

share|improve this answer

An interface is consist of singleton variables(public static final) and public abstract methods. We normally prefer interface in real time when we know what to do but don't know how to do . This concept can be understand by taking a simple example:

Consider we have a Payment class. payment can be done in so many ways like paypal, credit card So we normally take Payment as our interface which contains makePayment() method and CreditCard and PayPal are the two implementation classes.

public interface Payment
{
    void makePayment();//by default it is a abstract method
}
public class PayPal implements Payment
{
    public void makePayment()
    {
        //some logic for paypal payment
        //like paypal uses username and password for payment
    }
}
public class CreditCard implements Payment
{
    public void makePayment()
    {
        //some logic for CreditCard payment
        //like CreditCard uses card number, date of expiry etc...
    }
}

In the above example CreditCard and PayPal are two implementation classes /strategies. Interface also allows us the concept of multiple inheritance in java which can't be get by abstract class.

Coming to abstract class we choose abstract class when we know some features how to do and some features what to do

Lets take an example

public abstract class Burger
{
    public void packing()
    {
        //some logic to packing a berger
    }
    public abstract void price();//here price is different for different catagories.Thats why abstract method
}
public class VegBerger extends Burger
{
    public void price()
    {
        //set price for a veg burger.
    }
}
public class NonVegBerger extends Burger
{
    public void price()
    {
        //set price for a non-veg burger.
    }
}

If in future we add any method(may be concrete method/abstract method) then the implementation class wont need a change at code label . But if we add any method in an interface in future then it is mandatory to change all its implementation class all its code label otherwise compile time error occurs. There are still some more difference but these are the major difference which may your interviewer expected . Hopefully this will be little helpful

share|improve this answer

An interface is a "contract" where the class that implements the contract promises to implement the methods. An example where I had to write an interface instead of a class was when I was upgrading a game from 2D to 3D.

package adventure;
import java.awt.*;
public interface Playable {
    public void playSound(String s);
    public Image loadPicture(String s);

}

Then I can implement the methods based on the environment, while still being able to call those methods from an object that doesn't know which version of the game that is loading.

public class Adventure extends JFrame implements Playable

public class Dungeon3D extends SimpleApplication implements Playable

public class Main extends SimpleApplication implements AnimEventListener, ActionListener, Playable

Typically, in the gameworld, the world can be an abstract class that performs methods on the game:

public abstract class World...

    public Playable owner;

    public Playable getOwner() {
        return owner;
    }

    public void setOwner(Playable owner) {
        this.owner = owner;
    }
share|improve this answer

I do interviews for work and i would look unfavourably on your answer aswell (sorry but im very honest). It does sound like you've read about the difference and revised an answer but perhaps you have never used it in practice.

A good explanation as to why you would use each can be far better than having a precise explanation of the difference. Employers ultimatley want programers to do things not know them which can be hard to demonstrate in an interview. The answer you gave would be good if applying for a technical or documentation based job but not a developers role.

Best of luck with interviews in the future.

Also my answer to this question is more about interview technique rather than the technical material youve provided. Perhaps consider reading about it. http://workplace.stackexchange.com/ can be an excellent place for this sort of thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you tell me how you had answered it? May be it can help me. –  CODE FISH Oct 10 '13 at 6:09
    
giving you the answer offers a lot less then helping you work it out, basically give a practical example of when you would use each and explain why each is suited to the different tasks. –  Adrian Blackburn Oct 18 '13 at 12:06

The main difference what i have observed was that abstract class provides us with some common behaviour implemented already and subclasses only needs to implement specific functionality corresponding to them. where as for an interface will only specify what tasks needs to be done and no implementations will be given by interface. I can say it specifies the contract between itself and implemented classes.

share|improve this answer

Abstract classes are meant to be inherited from, and when one class inherits from another it means that there is a strong relationship between the 2 classes. With an interface on the other hand, the relationship between the interface itself and the class implementing the interface is not necessarily strong. So, we can summarize this first point by saying that an abstract class would be more appropriate when there is a strong relationship between the abstract class and the classes that will derive from it. Again, this is because an abstract class is very closely linked to inheritance, which implies a strong relationship. But, with interfaces there need not be a strong relationship between the interface and the classes that implement the interface. Java interface can extend multiple interface also Java class can implement multiple interfaces, Which means interface can provide more polymorphism support than abstract class . By extending abstract class, a class can only participate in one Type hierarchy but by using interface it can be part of multiple type hierarchies.

In order to implement interface in Java, until your class is abstract, you need to provide implementation of all methods, which is very painful. On the other hand abstract class may help you in this case by providing default implementation.

share|improve this answer

The main difference what i have observed was that abstract class provides us with some common behaviour implemented already and subclasses only needs to implement specific functionality corresponding to them. where as for an interface will only specify what tasks needs to be done and no implementations will be given by interface. I can say it specifies the contract between itself and implemented classes.

share|improve this answer

Abstract classes are not pure abstraction bcz its collection of concrete(implemented methods) as well as unimplemented methods. But Interfaces are pure abstraction bcz there are only unimplemented methods not concrete methods.

*Why Abstract classes:*

1) If user want write common functionality for all objects. 2) Abstract classes are best choice for reimplementation in future that to add more functionality without affecting of end user.

*Why Interfaces:*

1) If user want to write different functionality that would be different functionality on objects. 2) Interfaces are best choice that if not need to modify the requirements once interface has been published.

Mr Sarfaraz Ahamad Shaikh.

share|improve this answer

What about thinking the following way:

  • A relationship between a class and an abstract class is of type "is-a"
  • A relationship between a class and an interface is of type "has-a"

So when you have an abstract class Mammals, a subclass Human, and an interface Driving, then you can say

  • each Human is-a Mammal
  • each Human has-a Driving (behavior)

My suggestion is that the book knowledge phrase indicates that he wanted to hear the semantic difference between both (like others here already suggested).

share|improve this answer

You choose Interface to avoid Diamond Problem in java.

If you want all of your methods to be implemented by your client you go for interface. It means you design the entire application at abstract.

You choose abstract class if you already know what is in common. For example Take an abstract class Car. At higher level you implement the common car methods like calculateRPM(). It is a common method and you let the client implement his own behavior like
calculateMaxSpeed() etc. Probably you would have explained by giving few real time examples which you have encountered in your day to day job.

share|improve this answer

An interface is purely abstract. we dont have any implementation code in interface.

Abstract class contains both methods and its implementation.

click here to watch tutorial on interfaces and abstract classes

share|improve this answer

From what I understand, an Interface, which is comprised of final variables and methods with no implementations, is implemented by a class to obtain a group of methods or methods that are related to each other. On the other hand, an abstract class, which can contain non-final variables and methods with implementations, is usually used as a guide or as a superclass from which all related or similar classes inherits from. In other words, an abstract class contains all the methods/variables that are shared by all its subclasses.

share|improve this answer

In abstract class, you can write default implementation of methods! But in Interface you can not. Basically, In interface there exist pure virtual methods which have to be implemented by the class which implements the interface.

share|improve this answer

Almost everything seems to be covered here already.. Adding just one more practical implementation:

Abstract keyword is also used just prevent a class from being instantiated. If you have a concrete class which you do not want to be instantiated - Make it abstract.

share|improve this answer

hmm now the people are hungery practical approach, you are quite right but most of interviewer looks as per their current requirment and want a practical approach.

after finishing your answer you should jump on the example:

Abstract:

for example we have salary function which have some parametar common to all employee. then we can have a abstract class called CTC with partialy defined method body and it will got extends by all type of employee and get redeined as per their extra beefits. For common functonality.

public abstract class CTC {

    public int salary(int hra, int da, int extra)
    {
        int total;
        total = hra+da+extra;
        //incentive for specific performing employee
        //total = hra+da+extra+incentive;
        return total;
    }
}

class Manger extends CTC
{
}


class CEO extends CTC
{
}

class Developer extends CTC
{   
}

Interface

interface in java allow to have interfcae functionality without extending that one and you have to be clear with the implementation of signature of functionality that you want to introduce in your application. it will force you to have definiton. For different functionality. public interface EmployeType {

    public String typeOfEmployee();
}

class ContarctOne implements EmployeType
{

    @Override
    public String typeOfEmployee() {
        return "contract";
    }

}

class PermanentOne implements EmployeType
{

    @Override
    public String typeOfEmployee() {
        return "permanent";
    }

}

you can have such forced activity with abstract class too by defined methgos as a abstract one, now a class tha extends abstract class remin abstract one untill it override that abstract function.

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Mar 5 '14 at 8:33

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.