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I'd like to make a database of products. Each product have characteristics described as an array of x values and corresponding y values. And I'd like to query products for certain characteristics.

Example product data:

ProductA_x = [10, 20, 30, 40, 50]
ProductA_y = [2, 10, 30, 43, 49]

ProductB_x = [11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66]
ProductB_y = [13, 20, 42, 35, 28, 21]

Now I'd like to get a list of products where y < 35 @ x=31. In the example data case, I should get ProductA.

  • If I use MySQL, what would be a good way to define table(s) to achieve this query at SQL level?
  • Would it become easier if I could use PostgreSQL? (Use Array or JSON type??)

One way I was advised was to make a table to specify xy pairs for x range. First data is for range x[0] to x[1], next data is for x[1] to x[2]. Something like this.

| ProductID | x1 | x2 | y1 | y2 |
| --------- | -- | -- | -- | -- |
| 1 | 10 | 20 | 2 | 10 |
| 1 | 20 | 30 | 10 | 30 |
| 1 | 30 | 40 | 30 | 43 |
| 1 | 40 | 50 | 43 | 49 |
| 2 | 11 | 22 | 33 | 44 |
| 2 | 22 | 33 | 20 | 42 |
| 2 | 33 | 44 | 42 | 35 |
| 2 | 44 | 55 | 35 | 28 |
| 2 | 55 | 66 | 28 | 21 |

Then I could query for (x1 > 31 AND 31 < x2) AND (y1 < 35 OR y2 < 35)

This solution is not too bad but I wonder if there is cleverer approach.

Please note that x array is guaranteed to be incremental but different product would have different starting x value, step size and number of points. And x value to be searched for may not exist as exact value in x array. The length of real x and y arrays would be about 2000. I expect I'd have about 10,000 products.

It would be best if corresponding y value can be interpolated but searching y value at nearest x value is acceptable.

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1 Answer 1

since every X corresponds to exactly one Y, the sane table definition on a classic relational database would be:

CREATE TABLE product (id serial not null unique, sku text primary key, ....);
CREATE TABLE product_xy (product_id int not null references product(id),
                         x int not null,
                         y int not null,
                         primary key(product_id, x));

That would make your query manageable in all cases.

On PostgreSQL 9.3 you could use a LATERAL subquery to effectively use arrays but I don't think it would be easier than just going with a relational design to start with. The only case where you would want to store the info in an array in PostgreSQL is if ordinality mattered on the x array. Then the design becomes slightly more complex because the following array combinations are not semantically the same:

 array[1, 2, 3] x
 array[4, 5, 6] y

and

 array[2, 1, 3] x
 array[5, 4, 6] y

If those need to be distinct then go with an array-based solution in PostgreSQL (note that in both cases the same x value corresponds with the same y value, but the ordering of the pairs differs). Otherwise go with a standard relational design. If you have to go with that, then your better option is to have a 2-dimensional xy array that would be something like:

 array[
    array[1, 2, 3],
    array[4, 5, 6]
 ] xy

You could then have functions which could process these pairs on the array as a whole, but the point is that in this case the xy represents a single atomic value in a specific domain, where ordinality matters in both dimensions and therefore the value can be processed at once. In other words, if ordinality matters on both dimensions, then you have a single value in your domain and so this does not violate first normal form. If ordinality along either dimension does not matter, then it does violate first normal form.

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