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Consider the following code snippet:

#include <iostream>
#include <queue>

struct node {
    int key;
    node *l;
    node *r;

    node(int key)
        :key(key), l(nullptr), r(nullptr) {
    }
};

struct bst {
    node *root;

    bst() :root(nullptr) {

    }

    node* find(int key) {
        return find(root, key); 
    }

    node* find(node *root, int key) {
        if (!root) {
            return nullptr;
        } else {
            if (root->key < key) {
                return find(root->l, key);
            }
            else if (root->key > key) {
                return find(root->r, key);
            } else {
                return root;
            }
        }
    }

    void insert(int key) {
        insert(root, key);
    }

    void insert(node *&root, int key) {
        if (!root) {
            root = new node(key);
        } else {
            if (root->key < key) {
                insert(root->r, key);
            } else if (root->key > key) {
                insert(root->l, key);
            } else {
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    void print_by_level(std::ostream &o) {
        if (!root) {
            o << "(empty)";
            return;
        }
        std::queue<node*> q;
        int curr_lv = 1;
        int next_lv = 0;
        q.push(root);
        while (!q.empty()) {
            auto p = q.front();
            q.pop();
            curr_lv--;
            o << p->key << ' ';
            if (p->l) {
                q.push(p->l);
                next_lv++;
            }
            if (p->r) {
                q.push(p->r);
                next_lv++;
            }
            if (curr_lv == 0) {
                o << '\n';
                curr_lv = next_lv;
                next_lv = 0;
            }
        }
        o << '\n';
    }

};

int main() {
    bst t;
    t.insert(5);
    t.insert(10);
    t.insert(15);
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    // return pointer to 5 which is root
    node *p = t.find(5);
    // modify it, ok
    p->key = 100;
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    // now try to delete or change where p is pointing to
    delete p;
    p = nullptr;
    // then it's not happy :(
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    return 0;
}

I would expect p returning from find() is root, however it's not the case! It seemed like it only returned a copy of that pointer. However p->key = 100 actually changed the value of root. Could anyone help me explain this?

On the other hand, if I delete t.root manually then it worked as expected.

int main() {
    bst t;
    t.insert(5);
    t.insert(10);
    t.insert(15);
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    // return pointer to 5 which is root
    node *p = t.find(5);
    // modify it, ok
    p->key = 100;
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    delete t.root;
    t.root = nullptr;
    // ok happy now
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);
    return 0;
}

Now try to change where p points to and return node*&: (please forgive me for a dirty hack nullp :().

#include <iostream>
#include <queue>

struct node {
    int key;
    node *l;
    node *r;

    node(int key)
        :key(key), l(nullptr), r(nullptr) {
    }
};

struct bst {
    node *root;
    node *nullp;

    bst() :root(nullptr), nullp(nullptr) {

    }

    node*& find(int key) {
        return find(root, key); 
    }

    node*& find(node *root, int key) {
        if (!root) {
            return nullp;
        } else {
            if (root->key < key) {
                return find(root->l, key);
            }
            else if (root->key > key) {
                return find(root->r, key);
            } else {
                return root;
            }
        }
    }

    void insert(int key) {
        insert(root, key);
    }

    void insert(node *&root, int key) {
        if (!root) {
            root = new node(key);
        } else {
            if (root->key < key) {
                insert(root->r, key);
            } else if (root->key > key) {
                insert(root->l, key);
            } else {
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     *          p               q
     *         / \             / \
     *        q   x3     =>  x1   p
     *      /  \                 / \
     *     x1   x2              x2  x3
     */
    void rotate_w_left_child(node *&p) {
        node *q = p->l;
        p->l = q->r;
        q->r = p;
        p = q;
    }

    void print_by_level(std::ostream &o) {
        if (!root) {
            o << "(empty)";
            return;
        }
        std::queue<node*> q;
        int curr_lv = 1;
        int next_lv = 0;
        q.push(root);
        while (!q.empty()) {
            auto p = q.front();
            q.pop();
            curr_lv--;
            o << p->key << ' ';
            if (p->l) {
                q.push(p->l);
                next_lv++;
            }
            if (p->r) {
                q.push(p->r);
                next_lv++;
            }
            if (curr_lv == 0) {
                o << '\n';
                curr_lv = next_lv;
                next_lv = 0;
            }
        }
        o << '\n';
    }

};

int main() {
    bst t;
    t.insert(5);
    t.insert(4);
    t.insert(1);
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);
    node *p = t.find(5);
    // using root, happy
    // t.rotate_w_left_child(t.root);
    // t.print_by_level(std::cout);

    // using p, not happy :(
    t.rotate_w_left_child(p);
    t.print_by_level(std::cout);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Pointers point to a memory location. Dereferencing a pointer gives you acces to what it points to. 100 different pointers could point to the same place, so copy or original doesn't matter. –  Retired Ninja Sep 13 '13 at 5:53
    
It returns pointer to the found node*. If needed you have to make a copy of it. –  Arunprasad Rajkumar Sep 13 '13 at 5:54
    
What do you mean by I would expect p returning from find() is root? p == root should be true, but &p == &root will be false. –  Ken Y-N Sep 13 '13 at 5:58
    
when using that pice of code, when you want to t->find(2) it should also return the root node ptr. you should check for correct values else return nullptr; –  Zaiborg Sep 13 '13 at 6:02

2 Answers 2

In main when you delete p you are actually deleting the root pointer in the t object! Don't do that, or you will have undefined behavior, which is what you experience here.

When you return a pointer, you return a copy of the pointer, both pointers will point to the same object. If you then delete one of the pointers, the other pointer will now point to a deleted object.

share|improve this answer
    
But then it should print (empty) from t.print_by_level(std::cout); right? –  Chan Sep 13 '13 at 5:55
1  
@Chan Undefined behavior is, by its definition, undefined. It may even be the cause of nasal demons. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 13 '13 at 5:56
    
Thanks a lot. Got it, but what if I change where p points to instead of delete, will it still yield "undefined behavior"? –  Chan Sep 13 '13 at 5:58
    
@Chan No, because you just change the pointer p, not the pointer t.root. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 13 '13 at 5:59
    
So if I want the actual t.root, should I return node*& instead? –  Chan Sep 13 '13 at 6:02

[This is not necessarily answer, but a comment with code]

Your code may be suffering from Variable Shadowing, the member "root" clearly clashes with the function parameter "root".

A common practice to help avoid issues like this is to prefix members and other special cases with a prefix, such as "m_" for "member", "s_" for static, "g_" for "global". Don't confuse it with the dreaded hungarian - at least, not systems.

struct bst {
    node *m_root;
    node *m_nullp;

    bst() : m_root(nullptr), m_nullp(nullptr) {
    }

    node*& find(int key) {
        return find(m_root, key); 
    }

    node*& find(node *root, int key) {
        if (!root) { // definitely means the parameter
            return nullp;
        } else {
            if (root->key < key) {
                return find(root->l, key);
            }
            else if (root->key > key) {
                return find(root->r, key);
            } else {
                return root;
            }
        }
    }

    void insert(int key) {
        insert(m_root, key);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Good point, I was trying to quickly type a demo so the variable root was there by accident. Thanks anyway. –  Chan Sep 13 '13 at 6:49

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