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I have a method that checks some assumptions and either follows the happy path, or terminates along the unhappy paths. I've either designed it poorly, or I'm missing the method for testing that the control of the flow.

if (this.officeInfo.OfficeClosed)
{
    this.phoneCall.InformCallerThatOfficeIsClosedAndHangUp();
    return;
}
if (!this.operators.GetAllOperators().Any())
{
    this.phoneCall.InformCallerThatNoOneIsAvailableAndSendToVoicemail();
    return;
}
Call call=null;
forach(var operator in this.operators.GetAllOperators())
{
    call = operator.Call();
    if(call!=null) {break;}
}

and so on. I've got my dependencies injected. I've got my mocks moq'd. I can make sure that this or that is called, but I don't know how to test that the "return" happens. If TDD means I don't write a line until I have a test that fails without it, I'm stuck.

How would you test it? Or is there a way to write it that makes it more testable?

Update: Several answers have been posted saying that I should test the resultant calls, not the flow control. The problem I have with this approach, is that every test is required to setup and test the state and results of the other tests. This seems really unwieldy and brittle. Shouldn't I be able to test the first if clause alone, and then test the second one alone? Do I really need to have a logarithmically expanding set of tests that start looking like Method_WithParameter_DoesntInvokeMethod8IfMethod7IsTrueandMethod6IsTrueAndMethod5IsTrueAndMethod4IsTrueAndMethod3IsFalseAndMethod2IsTrueAndMethod1isAaaaccck()?

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Maybe your methods are too long. –  Josh Lee Dec 10 '09 at 6:32
    
I don't understand "every test is required to setup and test the state and results of the other tests". Te length of each test may match the length of the code, e.g. to see that operator.Call is invoked you have to ensure that officeInfo.OfficeClosed returns false and that operators.GetAllOperators().Any() returns true. –  ChrisW Dec 10 '09 at 14:00
    
What I mean is that the subsequent tests need to provide setup and verification that earlier lines of code did or did not run. This is required because I can't find a way to test for the point where the routine terminates. If there was a Assert.DidReturnAtLine(3) (which would of course be horribly brittle testing), I could be sure that an input state did not pass flow to the statements beyond that point. –  JoshRivers Dec 14 '09 at 22:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could go ballistic and use a strategy pattern. Something along the lines of having an interface IHandleCall, with a single void method DoTheRightThing(), and 3 classes HandleOfficeIsClosed, HandleEveryoneIsBusy, HandleGiveFirstOperatorAvailable, which implement the interface. And then have code like:

IHandleCall handleCall;
if (this.officeInfo.OfficeClosed)
{
    handleCall = new HandleOfficeIsClosed();
}
else if other condition
{
handleCall = new OtherImplementation();
}
handleCall.DoTheRightThing();
return;

That way you can get rid of the multiple return points in your method. Note that this is a very dirty outline, but essentially at that point you should extract the if/else into some factory, and then the only thing you have to test is that your class calls the factory, and that handleCall.DoTheRightThing() is called - (and of course that the factory returns the right strategy).

In any case, because you have already guarded against no operator available, you could simplify the end to:

var operator = this.operators.FindFirst();
call = operator.Call();
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I think you want to test the program's outputs: for example, that when this.officeInfo.OfficeClosed then the program does invoke this.phoneCall.InformCallerThatOfficeIsClosedAndHangUp() and does not invoke other methods such as this.operators.GetAllOperators().

I think that your test does this by asking its mock objects (phoneCall, etc.) which of their methods was invoked, or by getting them to throw an exception if any of their methods are invoked unexpectedly.

One way to do it is to make a log file of the program's inputs (e.g. 'OfficeClosed returns true') and outputs: then run the test, let the test generate the log file, and then assert that the contents of the generated log file match the expected log file contents for that test.

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I'm not sure that's really the right approach. You care about whether or not the method produced the expected result, not necessarily how control "flowed" through the particular method. For example, if phoneCall.InformCallerThatOfficeIsClosedAndHangUp is called, then I assume some result is recorded somewhere. So in your unit test, you would be asserting that result was indeed recorded (either by checking a database record, file, etc.).

With that said, it's important to ensure that your unit tests indeed cover your code. For that, you can use a tool like NCover to ensure that all of your code is being excercised. It'll generate a coverage report which will show you exactly which lines were executed by your unit tests and more importantly, which ones weren't.

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Don't test the flow control, just test the expected behavior. That is, unit testing does not care about the implementation details, only that the behavior of the method matches the specifications of the method. So if Add(int x, int y) should produce the result 4 on input x = 2, y = 2, then test that the output is 4 but don't worry about how Add produced the result.

To put it another way, unit testing should be invariant under implementation details and refactoring. But if you're testing implementation details in your unit testing, then you can't refactor without breaking the unit tests. For example, if you implement a method GetPrime(int k) to return the kth prime then check that GetPrime(10) returns 29 but don't test the flow control inside the method. If you implement GetPrime using the Sieve of Eratóstenes and have tested the flow control inside the method and later refactor to use the Sieve of Atkin, your unit tests will break. Again, all that matters is that GetPrime(10) returns 29, not how it does it.

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If you are stuck using TDD it's a good thing: it means that TDD drives your design and you are looking into how to change it so you can test it.

You can either: 1) verify state: check SUT state after SUT execution or 2) verify behavior: check that mock object calls complied with test expectations

If you don't like how either of these approaches look in your test it's time to refactor the code.

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I agree completely. My question is HOW do you refactor a set of if gates into testable code. –  JoshRivers Dec 14 '09 at 22:24

The pattern described by Aaron Feng and K. Scott Allen would solve for my problem and it's testability concerns. The only issue I see is that it requires all the computation to be performed up front. The decision data object needs to be populated before all of the conditionals. That's great unless it requires successive round trips to the persistence storage.

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