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I'm developing a Web application using Spring.

I have a common abstract class and many implementions of it.

Now, in a controller, depending on some parameter, I need different implementations of it.

This can be easily implemented with Factory Pattern.

For example:

abstract class Animal{
    public abstract void run(){
        }
}

class Dog extends Animal{   
...
}
Class Cat extends Animal{
...
}

Now with factory pattern, I can create a factory class with a factory method which creates Animals based on some parameter. But I don't want to create instances on my own.

I need the same functionality, but I want Spring to manage everything. Because different implementations have their dependencies and I want them to be injected by Spring.

What is the best way of handling this situation?

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how many dogs and cats do you want? –  Philipp Sander Sep 13 '13 at 9:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Configure the beans you want to be created as prototype beans. Next create a factory which basically knows which bean to retrieve from the application context based on the input (so instead of creating them you basically let spring do the heavy lifting).

Defining the components can be done with either @Component combinded with @Scope("prototype") or by using XML configuration.

abstract class Animal{
    public abstract void run(){}
}

@Component
@Scope("prototype")
class Dog extends Animal{}


@Component
@Scope("prototype")
Class Cat extends Animal{}

And an AnimalFactory to complete the answer.

@Component
public class AnimalFactory implements BeanFactoryAware {

    private BeanFactory factory;

    public Animal create(String input) {
        if ("cat".equals(input) ) {
            return factory.getBean(Cat.class);

        } else if ("dog".equals(input) ) {
            return factory.getBean(Dog.class);
        }
    }

    public void setBeanFactory(BeanFactory beanFactory) {
        this.factory=beanFactory;
    }

}
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Will AnimalFactory and its BeanFactory be Spring managed sot that I can autowire? –  isah Sep 13 '13 at 9:35
    
Well yes if you have that scanned and added @Component to it. The BeanFactory is a Spring interface (basically the super interface for an ApplicationContext. –  M. Deinum Sep 13 '13 at 9:36
    
I will try it soon and let you know, thanks. –  isah Sep 13 '13 at 9:42
    
Instead of doing the lookups, you could, as mentioned by @jb-nizet, inject the animals by using a Provider or ObjectFactory that would remove the BeanFactory and lookups. –  M. Deinum Sep 13 '13 at 9:46
@Component
public class AnimalFactory {
    @Autowired
    private Dog dog;

    @Autowired
    private Cat cat;

    public Animal create(String kind) {
        if (king.equals("dog") {
            return dog;
        }
        else {
            return cat;
        }
    }
}

@Component
public class Cat extends Animal {
    ...
}

@Component
public class Dog extends Animal {
    ...
}

@Component
private class Client {
    @Autowired
    private AnimalFactory factory;

    public void foo() {
        Animal animal = factory.create("dog"); 
        animal.run();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
then you can only have one cat and one dog because they are singletons by default. but if the OP wants that: this is the way to go –  Philipp Sander Sep 13 '13 at 9:01
    
Thanks. What if I want a fresh instance of Animal everytime create method is called, is there a workaround? –  isah Sep 13 '13 at 9:08
    
Yes, you can autowire an ObjectFactory<Dog> and an ObjectFactory<Cat> in your factory, and make Dog and Cat prototype beans. You can also use a Provider<Dog> and Provider<Cat>. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3891997/… –  JB Nizet Sep 13 '13 at 9:13
    
with xml-configuration, you can set the bean-scope. By default, singleton is applied, but there are others. You are looking for prototype. I will update my answer with this info. See docs.spring.io/spring/docs/3.0.0.M3/reference/html/ch04s04.html for more on the matter. –  kmae Sep 13 '13 at 9:14

In addition to JB's answer, you can also use XML-based configuration. The following will work as well:

package com.example;

class PetOwner(){ 

 private Animal animal;

 public PetOwner() {
 };

 public void setAnimal(Animal animal) {
    this.animal = animal;
 }
}

with the following xml-config:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:p="http://www.springframework.org/schema/p"
    xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd 
    http://www.springframework.org/schema/context http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-3.0.xsd">

<bean id="petOwner" class="com.example.PetOwner">
        <property name="animal" ref="animal" />
</bean>

<bean id="animal" class="com.example.pets.Dog" scope="prototype" />

The prototype-scope will return a new instance every time a request for the object is made. See http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/3.0.0.M3/reference/html/ch04s04.html

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