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(disclaimer: this is my first stackoverflow question so forgive me in advance if I'm not too clear)

Expected results:

My task is to find company legal identifiers in a string representing a company name, then separate them from it and save them in a separate string. The company names have already been cleaned so that they only contain alphanumeric lowercase characters.

Example:

company_1 = 'uber wien abcd gmbh'
company_2 = 'uber wien abcd g m b h'
company_3 = 'uber wien abcd ges mbh'

should result in

company_1_name = 'uber wien abcd'
company_1_legal = 'gmbh'
company_2_name = 'uber wien abcd'
company_2_legal = 'gmbh'
company_3_name = 'uber wien abcd'
company_3_legal = 'gesmbh'

Where I am right now:

I load the list of all company ids up from a csv file. Austria provides a good example. Two legal ids are:

gmbh
gesmbh

I use a regex expression that tells me IF the company name contains the legal identifier. However, this regex removes all spaces from the string in order to identify the legal id.

company_1_nospace = 'uberwienabcdgmbh'
company_2_nospace = 'uberwienabcdgmbh'
company_3_nospace = 'uberwienabcdgesmbh'

since I look for the regex in the string without spaces, I am able to see that all three companies have legal ids inside their name.

Where I am stuck:

I can say whether there is a legal id in company_1, company_2, and company_3 but I can only remove it from company_1. In fact, I cannot remove g m b h because it does not match, but I can say that it is a legal id. The only way I could remove it is to also remove spaces in the rest of the company name, which I dont want to do (it would only be a last resort option)

Even if I were to insert spaces into gmbh to match it with g m b h, I would then not pick up ges mbh or ges m b h. (Note that the same thing happens for other countries)

My code:

import re
re_code = re.compile('^gmbh|gmbh$|^gesmbh|gesmbh$')
comp_id_re = re_code.search(re.sub('\s+', '', company_name))
if comp_id_re:
    company_id = comp_id_re.group()
    company_name = re.sub(re_code, '', company_name).strip()
else:
    company_id = ''

Is there a way for python to understand which characters to remove from the original string? Or would it just be easier if somehow (that's another problem) I find all possible alternatives for legal id spacing? ie from gmbh I create g mbh, gm bh, gmb h, g m bh, etc... and use that for matching/extraction?

I hope I have been clear enough with my explanation. Thinking about a title for this was rather difficult.

UPDATE 1: company ids are usually at the end of the company name string. They can occasionally be at the beginning in some countries.

UPDATE 2: I think this takes care of the company ids inside the company name. It works for legal ids at the end of the company name, but it does not work for company ids at the beginning

legal_regex = '^ltd|ltd$|^gmbh|gmbh$|^gesmbh|gesmbh$'
def foo(name, legal_regex):
    #compile regex that matches company ids at beginning/end of string
    re_code = re.compile(legal_regex)
    #remove spaces
    name_stream = name.replace(' ','')
    #find regex matches for legal ids
    comp_id_re = re_code.search(name_stream)
    #save company_id, remove it from string
    if comp_id_re:
        company_id = comp_id_re.group()
        name_stream = re.sub(re_code, '', name_stream).strip()
    else:
        company_id = ''
    #restore spaced string (only works if id is at the end)
    name_stream_it = iter(name_stream)
    company_name = ''.join(next(name_stream_it) if e != ' ' else ' ' for e in name)
       return (company_name, company_id)
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3 Answers

Non-Regex solution would be easier here, and this is how, I would do it

legal_ids = """gmbh
gesmbh"""
def foo(name, legal_ids):
    #Remove all spaces from the string
    name_stream = name.replace(' ','')
    #Now iterate through the legal_ids
    for id in legal_ids:
            #Remove the legal ID's from the string
        name_stream = name_stream.replace(id, '')
    #Now Create an iterator of the modified string
    name_stream_it = iter(name_stream)
    #Fill in the missing/removed spaces
    return ''.join(next(name_stream_it) if e != ' ' else ' ' for e in name)

foo(company_1, legal_ids.splitlines())
'uber wien abcd '
foo(company_2, legal_ids.splitlines())
'uber wien abcd '
foo(company_3, legal_ids.splitlines())
'uber wien abcd '
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This is good, but not 100%. In fact foo removes company legal ids from the whole string, regardless of where it finds the company id. so say a company is called smelt division in UK, this would return sme ivision ltd, I guess. EDIT: actually, it returns smeiv ision –  mkln Sep 13 '13 at 9:57
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Here's the code I came up with:

company_1 = 'uber wien abcd gmbh'
company_2 = 'uber wien abcd g m b h'
company_3 = 'uber wien abcd ges mbh'
legalids = ["gmbh", "gesmbh"]

def info(company, legalids):
    for legalid in legalids:
        found = []

        last_pos = len(company)-1
        pos = len(legalid)-1
        while True:
            if len(legalid) == len(found):
                newfound = found
                newfound.reverse()
                if legalid == ''.join(newfound):
                    return [company[:last_pos+1].strip(' '), legalid]
                else:
                    break

            if company[last_pos] == ' ':
                last_pos -= 1
                continue
            elif company[last_pos] == legalid[pos]:
                found.append(company[last_pos])
                pos -= 1
            else:
                break
            last_pos -= 1
    return

print(info(company_1, legalids))
print(info(company_2, legalids))
print(info(company_3, legalids))

Output:

['uber wien abcd', 'gmbh']
['uber wien abcd', 'gmbh']
['uber wien abcd', 'gesmbh']
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I'm not sure why, but company_1 = 'uber wien abcd ltd' legalids = ["ltd", "gmbh", "gesmbh", "spa"] results in None (company_2 = 'uber wien abcd ges mbh spa' instead correctly identifies spa as legal id) Also, I guess it would not be too difficult to make it go forward instead of backwards in order for it to see the legal ids at the beginning of the strings –  mkln Sep 13 '13 at 10:21
    
@mkin figured out the problem: when the found array is of the same length, the letter "d" is detected again and added to the found array, thus causing it to fail. –  wei2912 Sep 13 '13 at 10:23
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think I got to an acceptable solution. I used part of my original code, part of the code by @Abhijit and the main idea behind @wei2912 's code. Thank you all

Here is the code I am going to use:

legal_ids = '^ltd|ltd$|^gmbh|gmbh$|^gesmbh|gesmbh$'

def foo(name, legal_ids):
    #initialize re (company id at beginning or end of string)
    re_code = re.compile(legal_ids)
    #remove spaces from name
    name_stream = name.replace(' ','')
    #search for matches
    comp_id_re = re_code.search(name_stream)
    if comp_id_re:
        #match was found, extract the matching company id
        company_id = comp_id_re.group()
        #remove the id from the string without spaces
        name_stream = re.sub(re_code, '', name_stream).strip()
        if comp_id_re.start()>0:
            #the legal id was NOT at the beginning of the string, proceed normally
            name_stream_it = iter(name_stream)
            final_name = ''.join(next(name_stream_it) if e != ' ' else ' ' for e in name)
        else:
            #the legal id was at the beginning of the string, so do the same as above, but with the reversed strings
            name_stream_it = iter(name_stream[::-1])
            final_name = ''.join(next(name_stream_it) if e != ' ' else ' ' for e in name[::-1])
            #reverse the string to get it back to normal
            final_name = final_name[::-1]
    else:
        company_id = ''
        final_name = name
    return (final_name.strip(), company_id)
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