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I am looking at introducing a distributed cache to our .net web application.

I have been playing around with memcache and specifically Enyim Memcached Client.

It has all gone quite smoothly. I am able to add and retrieve items from the cache.

For example:

MemcachedClient cache = new MemcachedClient();
cache.Store(Enyim.Caching.Memcached.StoreMode.Set, key, value, absoluteExpiration);

Now my question is this. Our application is big, it has been built on by lots of developers over many years. Our app frequently uses HttpRuntime.Cache

eg HttpRuntime.Cache.Add(...

Ideally I don't want to have to go through all the code with a search and replace to update each 'HttpRuntime.Cache.Add' to 'cache.Store'. It will also be difficult when it comes to replacing 'Cache["blah"]' with 'cache.Get("blah")'.

Am I missing a trick? Is there a way that a call to 'HttpRuntime.Cache.Add' could use the memcache 'cache.Get' instead? In my head this would then require no search and replace.

Thanks for reading

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Without deeper knowledge of your particular issue I would expect that adding a cache layer should be totally transparent to the application. It should be invisible to the application and configured by some underlying layer. The higher tiers of an app should not be aware if or what kind of cache is used. In your case it looks like it would be a good idea to refactor HttpRuntime.Cache into an interface and inject the appropriate cache. However this may impose a lot of work. –  Samuel Sep 13 '13 at 11:04
    
I'd assumed the same but haven't been able to find an example of that being the case. I have found examples of implementation of Session State in memcache and it was just a simple web.config change. –  Scott Sep 13 '13 at 11:14

1 Answer 1

If you are going to create a dependency on a third party component, I recommend that you do so with a wrapper or facade of your own with something like this. You can then replace all your existing usage of Cache and when and if you want to change the underlying caching provider, you need change your code in only once place.

public interface IHappyCache
{
    object Add(string key, object value, CacheDependency dependencies, 
        DateTime absoluteExpiration, TimeSpan slidingExpiration, 
        CacheItemPriority priority, CacheItemRemovedCallback onRemoveCallback);

    object this[string key] { get; set; }
}

public class HappyCache : IHappyCache
{
    public object Add(string key, object value, CacheDependency dependencies, 
        DateTime absoluteExpiration, TimeSpan slidingExpiration, 
        CacheItemPriority priority, CacheItemRemovedCallback onRemoveCallback)
    {
        //wrapper to whatever caching mechanism you want to use
        return new object();
    }

    public object this[string key]
    {
        get
        {
            //wrapper to whatever caching mechanism you want to use
            return new object();
        }
        set
        {
            //wrapper to whatever caching mechanism you want to use
        }
    }
}

Of course, you may find that you have to build out that interface and the implementation more than I have here. And I recommend that you inject the interface where you will need it using an IOC container so that your tests can use an alternate implementation or mock.

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