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I am facing an issue with using Mongo DB on a Java servlet.

My servlet has many methods(~20) of accessing the database for retrieving and adding data. A very brief example of one :

public static String getSomething(String s) {
  String json = "[]";
  JSONArray jsonArray = new JSONArray();
  DBCollection table;

  try {
    Mongo mongo = new Mongo("localhost", 27017);
    DB db = mongo.getDB( "myDb" );  
        BasicDBObject quoteQuery = new BasicDBObject("abc", abc);
    DBCursor cursor = table.find(quoteQuery);

    try {
      while(cursor.hasNext()) {
        jsonArray.put(cursor.next());
      }
    } finally {
      cursor.close();
    }

// ...

Now the problem is when this Java servlet is deployed in the linux server, it works fine for 10 days or so.

After that it crashes.

When I go to mongodb.log in my var/log directory I get the following repetitive output:

"connection refused because too many open connections"

I am not sure on where to edit things now or how to deal with this. I have tried to grow the limit of open connections in the server but still have the same results.

Any suggestions?

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Did you get the solution that solved your problem?? –  Jhanvi Sep 17 '13 at 8:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should create Mongo objects very sparingly, ideally even only one per classloader at any time. To reduce the number of Mongo objects you could create it in the servlet's init method and re-use that instance on every call.

EDIT: just had a look at our code, we manage the Mongo instance using a classic singleton class (and always fetch a Mongo using that class's getInstance() method) because if you have multiple servlets / entrypoints in your app just using init() will still generate one instance per servlet, and still won't satisfy the manual section cited by @FredClose

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Why not initialize it in a ServletContextListener and set it as attribute to the context, this will make our application fail-fast too. Close it in listener destroy method. –  Pankaj Aug 9 at 18:40
    
@Pankaj that would indeed be an even better solution. –  fvu Aug 11 at 10:10
    
Thanks, anyone interested can look for example at journaldev.com/4011/… –  Pankaj Aug 13 at 18:49

from the API doc : http://api.mongodb.org/java/2.11.3/

public class Mongo extends Object

A database connection with internal connection pooling. For most applications, you should have one Mongo instance for the entire JVM.

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You may create the mongo object for once instead of creating it on each getSomething call.

public SomeClass{
static Mongo mongo = new Mongo("localhost", 27017);
static DB db = mongo.getDB( "myDb" );  

public static String getSomething(String s) {
String json = "[]";
JSONArray jsonArray = new JSONArray();
DBCollection table;
try {

BasicDBObject quoteQuery = new BasicDBObject("abc", abc);
DBCursor cursor = table.find(quoteQuery);

while(cursor.hasNext()) {
  jsonArray.put(cursor.next());

}

}

Actually the ideal case is not using static access at all and inject DB object from a central controller.

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Your are creating connections in MongoDB, but you are not closing connections. For any database, it is very very important to close a connection, otherwise it will reach to its maximum limit and you wont be able to execute your program properly. Following code will be helpful i hope:

        public static String getSomething(String s) {
    String json = "[]";
    JSONArray jsonArray = new JSONArray();

    try {

        MongoClient mongoClient = new MongoClient("localhost", 27017);
        DB db = mongoClient.getDB("myDb");
        DBCollection collection = db.getCollection("NAME OF YOUR COLLECTION");
        BasicDBObject quoteQuery = new BasicDBObject("abc", "VARIABLE THAT YOU WANT TO FIND");

        DBCursor cursor = collection.find(quoteQuery);
        try {
            while (cursor.hasNext()) {
                jsonArray.put(cursor.next());
            }
        } finally {
            cursor.close();
        }
        mongoClient.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
    return jsonArray.toString();
}

In this code, 'MongoClient' is closed after its purpose is over.

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Arun Gupta ‏@arungupta

New sample shows how to use Mongo within a #JavaEE7 app: New sample to show basic usage of Mongo in a Java EE application

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