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I am looking for a perl program that does a substitution but my looping is not working each time. The concept for example is:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @array1 = qw(A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog);
my @array2 = qw(fox dog);
my @array3 = qw(rabbit cat);

I want the second array to compare with the first array, pick out the elements fox and dog, replace it with rabbit and cat.

So the sentence should become "A quick brown rabbit jumped over the lazy cat".

This is the concept but the data is different and the second and third array contains maybe 50 elements each. Any help would be appreciated.

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4  
Please show the code you have tried and explain what it is doing or not doing. –  AdrianHHH Sep 13 '13 at 12:26
    
Instead of having @array2 and @array3 you should use a single hash instead: my %map = ("fox" => "rabbit", "dog" => "cat", ...); –  Slaven Rezic Sep 13 '13 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd do something like:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump qw(dump);

my @array1 = qw(A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog);
my @array2 = qw(fox dog);
my @array3 = qw(rabbit cat);
my %corresp;
@corresp{@array2} = @array3;

foreach my $word(@array1) {
    $word = $corresp{$word} if exists $corresp{$word};
}
dump@array1;

output:

(
  "A",
  "quick",
  "brown",
  "rabbit",
  "jumps",
  "over",
  "the",
  "lazy",
  "cat",
)
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1  
@TLP @corresp{map fc, @array2} = @array3; –  Сухой27 Sep 13 '13 at 12:45
    
@mpapec Yes, either way, using hashes is the only viable option. –  TLP Sep 13 '13 at 12:47
#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @array1 = qw(A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog);
my @array2 = qw(fox dog);
my @array3 = qw(rabbit cat);

my %h;
@h{@array2} = @array3;

@array1 = map { $h{$_} || $_ } @array1;
share|improve this answer
    
also, $_ = $h{$_} || $_ for @array1; –  Сухой27 Sep 13 '13 at 12:40

I don t know perl, but I think something like: (javascript influenced)

function replace (array, oldword, newword){
    var i = array.search(oldworld),
        a = array.substr(0, i),
        n = array.substr(oldword.length, array.length);
    return a + newword + b;
}

Putted in a loop should work.

(Example of output:)

console.log(replace('A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog', 'fox', 'rabbit'));

A quick brown rabbit jumps over the lazy dog
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I'm pretty new myself but this is what I came up with:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array1 = qw(A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog);
my @array2 = qw(fox dog);
my @array3 = qw(rabbit cat);

my $index = 0;

foreach (@array1) {
$index++ if s/$array2[$index]/$array3[$index]/;
}

print join(' ',@array1), "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
This will not work if the words in array2 are not in the same order than they appear in array1 (ie: try changing array1 to qw(A quick brown dog jumps over the lazy fox); –  M42 Sep 13 '13 at 16:36
    
I see what you mean. Back to the drawing board. –  Scooter Ivy Sep 13 '13 at 16:41

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