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I have a class that should accept different datatypes as the second constructor parameter:

public abstract class QueryMatch {
String key;
Object input;

public <T> QueryMatch(String key, T o) {
    this.key = key;
    input = o;
}

public String getKey() {
    return key;
}

public Object getValue() {
    return input;
}
}

I don't want to use type parameters, like

public abstract class QueryMatch<T>{
String key;
T input;
...

As this way I'm getting raw types warnings when declaring retrieving QueryMatch as a generic (as I don't know the datatype it contains). But the problem is that I need to return the value and I'm not totally comfortable by returning an Object (is that just me, but it doesn't seem like a good practice?).

Additionally, another class inherits from it:

public class QueryMatchOr extends QueryMatch {
public QueryMatchOr() {
    super("title", new ArrayList<String>());
}

public void addMatch(String match) {
    ((ArrayList<String>) input).add(match);
}

}

And of course I'm getting a Unchecked cast warning (which I can avoid with @SuppressWarnings(“unchecked”)).

So, my question is... is there a better way to achieve what I'm trying to do? An abstract class that contains an object (which could be bounded), and returning the datatype it contains (instead of an Object) without using a type parameter in the class declaration?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are doing is not a good design. You are using an Object type field from the superclass while you only can know it's actual (needed) type in the subclass. If you only know that in the subclass, declare that variable in the subclass. Not even to mention that your fields are not private.

How about:

public abstract class QueryMatch {

    private String key;

    public QueryMatch(String key) {
        this.key = key;
    }

    public String getKey() {
        return key;
    }

    public abstract void addMatch(String match);
}


public class QueryMatchOr extends QueryMatch {

    private ArrayList<String> input;

    public QueryMatchOr() {
        super("title");
        input = new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    public void addMatch(String match) {
        input.add(match);
    }
}

If you need the getValue() method in the superclass, you really should make it generic:

public abstract class QueryMatch<T> {

    private String key;

    public QueryMatch(String key) {
        this.key = key;
    }

    public String getKey() {
        return key;
    }

    public abstract void addMatch(String match);

    public abstract T getValue();
}


public class QueryMatchOr extends QueryMatch<ArrayList<String>> {

    private ArrayList<String> input;

    public QueryMatchOr() {
        super("title");
        input = new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    public void addMatch(String match) {
        input.add(match);
    }

    public ArrayList<String> getValue(String match) {
        input;
    }
}
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I see, thanks for the info, but I need the getValue() method available for all the inherited classes.I'm processing the values from another class, and for that I need to retrieve the values with QueryMatch.getValue() –  Pnikosis Sep 13 '13 at 13:16
    
Then the right way would be to make the whole class generic. What's your reason for not wanting to do that anyway? Will edit my answer... –  André Stannek Sep 13 '13 at 13:21
    
Looks that the generic way is then. Oh, I didn't want to do that because when I have to retrieve the QueryMatch values, I have to declare them without type parameters, and I get a raw data type warning. For example QueryMatch qMatch = someClass.getQueryMatch(); System.out.println(qMatch.getValue()); –  Pnikosis Sep 13 '13 at 13:43
    
Sounds like you don't get around that warning ;-) But in my opinion this is the best way. –  André Stannek Sep 13 '13 at 14:40

So first, I think the best answer is to make your class generic. But if you really don't want to do this you could do something like this:

public <T> T getValue(Class<T> type) {
    return (T)input;
}

In some way you need to provide the expected type for the return value to the class. This can either be done my making that class generic or the method generic.

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Why a = method(Class<Type>) is better than ` a = (Type) method()`? –  Val Sep 13 '13 at 12:25
    
@Val its not, especially since with type-erasure this is what the compiled code would look like. But it answers the question without going into theories / opinions about what would be better. –  John B Sep 13 '13 at 12:28
    
Thanks! it seems I will stick with the generic way then. –  Pnikosis Sep 13 '13 at 13:17

So, my question is... is there a better way to achieve what I'm trying to do?

No, there isn't.

I think you should use generics instead of @SuppressWarnings(“unchecked”))

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