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Given 2 angles in the range -PI -> PI around a coordinate, what is the value of the smallest of the 2 angles between them?

Taking into account that the difference between PI and -PI is not 2 PI but zero.

Example:

Imagine a circle, with 2 lines coming out from the center, there are 2 angles between those lines, the angle they make on the inside aka the smaller angle, and the angle they make on the outside, aka the bigger angle. Both angles when added up make a full circle. Given that each angle can fit within a certain range, what is the smaller angles value, taking into account the rollover

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1  
I read 3 times before I understood what you meant. Please add an example, or explain better... –  Kobi Dec 10 '09 at 6:12
    
Imagine a circle, with 2 lines comign out from the center, there are 2 angles between those lines, the angle they make on the inside aka the smaller angle, and the angle they make on the outside, aka the bigger angle. Both angles when added up make a full circle. Given that each angle can fit within a certain range, what is the smaller angles value, taking into account the rollover –  Tom J Nowell Dec 10 '09 at 6:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

This gives a signed angle for any angles:

a = targetA - sourceA
a = (a + 180) % 360 - 180

Beware in many languages the modulo operation returns a value with the same sign as the dividend (like C, C++, C#, JavaScript, full list here). This requires a custom mod function like so:

mod = (a, n) -> (a % n + n) % n

If angles are within [-180, 180] this also works:

a = targetA - sourceA
a += (a>180) ? -360 : (a<-180) ? 360 : 0

In a more verbose way:

a = targetA - sourceA
a -= 360 if a > 180
a += 360 if a < -180
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Simpler and makes more sense read out loud, though effectively the same thing, first bti figures out the angle, second part makes sure its always the smaller of the 2 possible angles –  Tom J Nowell Oct 25 '11 at 11:48
    
although one might want to do a % 360, e.g. if I had the angle 0 and the target angle 721, the correct answer would be 1, the answer given by the above would be 361 –  Tom J Nowell Oct 25 '11 at 11:51
    
Yes that's true and deliberate but definitely worth pointing out. In my example I previously got targetA and sourceA from atan2, hence their absolute angles are never greater than 360. –  bennedich Oct 26 '11 at 1:31

x is the target angle. y is the source or starting angle:

atan2(sin(x-y), cos(x-y))

It returns the signed delta angle. Note that depending on your API the order of the parameters for the atan2() function might be different.

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1  
this works. why? –  ericsoco May 11 '13 at 18:25
3  
x-y gives you the difference in angle, but it may be out of the desired bounds. Think of this angle defining a point on the unit circle. The coordinates of that point are (cos(x-y), sin(x-y)). atan2 returns the angle for that point (which is equivalent to x-y) except its range is [-PI, PI]. –  Max Sep 2 '13 at 16:17

If your two angles are x and y, then one of the angles between them is abs(x - y). The other angle is (2 * PI) - abs(x - y). So the value of the smallest of the 2 angles is:

min((2 * PI) - abs(x - y), abs(x - y))
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beat me by 1 second! :) cheers –  Donnie DeBoer Dec 10 '09 at 6:10
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^_^ thanks, but I challenge you to give me a version that preserves the negative positiveness, aka 40* to the left versus 40* to the right –  Tom J Nowell Dec 10 '09 at 7:20

I rise to the challenge of providing the signed answer:

def f(x,y):
  import math
  return min(y-x, y-x+2*math.pi, y-x-2*math.pi, key=abs)
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1  
Ah... the answer is a Python function by the way. Sorry, I was in Python mode for a moment. Hope that's okay. –  David Jones Jan 5 '10 at 16:20
    
I shall plug the new formula into my code upstairs and see what becomes of it! ( thankyou ^_^ ) –  Tom J Nowell Jan 5 '10 at 17:25
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I'm pretty sure PeterB's answer is correct too. And evilly hackish. :) –  David Jones Jan 5 '10 at 18:04
2  
But this one contains no trig functions :) –  nornagon Mar 10 '10 at 23:34

Arithmetical (as opposed to algorithmic) solution:

angle = Pi - abs(abs(a1 - a2) - Pi);
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There is no need to compute trigonometric functions. The simple code in C language is:

#include <math.h>
#define PIV2 M_PI+M_PI
#define C360 360.0000000000000000000
double difangrad(double x, double y)
{
double arg;

arg = fmod(y-x, PIV2);
if (arg < 0 )  arg  = arg + PIV2;
if (arg > M_PI) arg  = arg - PIV2;

return (-arg);
}
double difangdeg(double x, double y)
{
double arg;
arg = fmod(y-x, C360);
if (arg < 0 )  arg  = arg + C360;
if (arg > 180) arg  = arg - C360;
return (-arg);
}

let dif = a - b , in radians

dif = difangrad(a,b);

let dif = a - b , in degrees

dif = difangdeg(a,b);

difangdeg(180.000000 , -180.000000) = 0.000000
difangdeg(-180.000000 , 180.000000) = -0.000000
difangdeg(359.000000 , 1.000000) = -2.000000
difangdeg(1.000000 , 359.000000) = 2.000000

No sin, no cos, no tan,.... only geometry!!!!

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2  
Bug! Since you #define PIV2 as "M_PI+M_PI", not "(M_PI+M_PI)", the line arg = arg - PIV2; expands to arg = arg - M_PI + M_PI, and so does nothing. –  canton7 Jan 19 at 11:53

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