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This is a little difficult to explain but I will try my best. I have a database which maintains information on Marine Shipping etc. I have the following columns to work with. (There are others but they don't have any purpose for my study) I have Message_ID, Latitude, Longitude, MMSI (This represents individual ship signals, hence they are unique to ships) Ship_type, Vessel_name.

So here's the issue

  • I need only Message_ID's 1 and 3.
  • Unfortunately Message_ID's 1 and 3 have Ship_type and Vessel_name as Null within their respective spots.
  • Message_ID 5 has both Ship_type and Vessel_name marked.
  • My study area is within given latitude and longitudes

Essentially what I need to do is append the Ship_type and Vessel_name to the lines with Message_ID's 1 and 3 by way of joining through the MMSI number which is shared by a Message_ID 5.

the queries I have so far..

WHERE (latitude > 55 and latitude < 85 and longitude > 50 and longitude < 141) And (Message_ID = 1 or Message_ID = 3);

Other Query

WHERE Message_ID = 5;

How do I join all Ship_type and Vessel_name that result in the second query to the first query?

I FEEL LIKE IT SHOULD BE MENTIONED THAT EVERYTHING IS WITHIN ONE TABLE ENTITLED dbo.DecodedCSVMEssages_Staging THAT HAS ABOUT 100 MILLION ENTRIES.. :S

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3 Answers 3

I would probably do it like this:

SELECT
     t13.Message_ID, 
     t13.Latitude, 
     t13.Longitude, 
     t13.MMSI,
     t5.Ship_type, 
     t5.Vessel_name
FROM yourTable As t13
OUTER APPLY (   SELECT TOP 1 * 
                FROM  yourTable As t5
                WHERE t5.Message_ID = 5
                  AND t5.MMSI = t13.MMSI
             ) As t5
WHERE t13.Message_ID IN(1,3)
  AND t13.latitude > 55 
  and t13.latitude < 85 
  and t13.longitude > 50 
  and t13.longitude < 141
share|improve this answer
    
what does t13. and t5. stand for? –  dpalm Sep 13 '13 at 16:52
1  
@dpalm that's convenient syntax called a table alias. –  Tim Lehner Sep 13 '13 at 16:54
    
so essentially you've given the table name an alias? –  dpalm Sep 13 '13 at 16:56
    
Yes, it's the same as SELECT yourTable.Message_ID, [...] but could be less typing, and more importantly allows a subquery to unambiguously reference a table in the outer query (in this case in the OUTER APPLY portion). –  Tim Lehner Sep 13 '13 at 16:59
    
@dpalm Yes. They're a convenience when you have long table names that you don't want to clutter up the column names. However, they're required for subqueries (and CTEs) and when you reference the same table/view more than once in the same FROM clause, so that the SQL compiler can tell which table+column you are referring to in your column references. –  RBarryYoung Sep 13 '13 at 17:01

I think you want something like this:

select Message_ID, Latitude, Longitude, MMSI, x.Ship_type, x.Vessel_name
from table t
outer apply (select Ship_type, Vessel_name from table x where x.MMSI=t.MMSI and x.Message_ID=5) x
where t.Message_ID in (1,3) and (latitude > 55 and latitude < 85 and longitude > 50 and longitude < 141);
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what does the x stand for? –  dpalm Sep 13 '13 at 16:56
    
It is the alias given to the OUTER APPLY part in the query. –  Dan Bellandi Sep 13 '13 at 16:58
with ship_cte(Ship_type,Vessel_name,MMSI)
as(select Distinct Ship_type,Vessel_name,MMSI  from TableName WHERE Message_ID = 5)

select b.Ship_type,b.Vessel_name,a.other_columns 
from tableName a join ship_cte b on a.MMSI=b.MMSI
WHERE (a.latitude > 55 and a.latitude < 85 and a.longitude > 50 and a.longitude < 141) 
And (a.Message_ID = 1 or a.Message_ID = 3);

Here in the first part of the query I'm getting ship_type and vessel_name for all the rows where message_id=5, and then I'm joining this part of the query with main table on the basis of MMSI number.

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1  
You are going to get multiplications on your Join unless the table is unique on (MMSI, Message_ID). –  RBarryYoung Sep 13 '13 at 16:42
    
Thanks for pointing it @RBarryYoung, I've edited the code to consider only distinct. –  Sonam Sep 13 '13 at 16:45
    
Good point, I assumed (Message_ID,MMSI) was unique in my answer as well. The TOP(1) addresses it in any case. –  Dan Bellandi Sep 13 '13 at 16:47
    
I'm relatively new to SQL Server, I'm not sure where the ship_cte came from? –  dpalm Sep 13 '13 at 16:54
1  
@dpalm The with clause defines CTEs (Common Table Expressions) which are just a type of subquery. ship_cte is it's alias because table subqueries must have an alias so that you can refer to their columns later on. –  RBarryYoung Sep 13 '13 at 17:06

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