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First of all, I am totally new in web programming.

I am programming with ASP.NET. I have three links like below:

<ul style="margin-top:10px;">
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
</ul>

Note that the three dots "..." represents something (it is an example).

What I want is avoid repeating all the time for each link the style, so I create an iD in css file as below:

a#myStyle {
    background-color:transparent;
    padding:0px;
}

and then apply to all link at once through a div:

<ul style="margin-top:10px;">
   <div id="myStyle">
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a style="background-color:transparent;padding:0px;" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   </div>
</ul>

but it does not work.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your selector is in the wrong order and you also need a space between the ID value and the type selector, as the <a> is a descendant of the div. Use this instead:

#myStyle a {
   background-color:transparent;
   padding:0px;
}
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1  
Thanks, it works like a charm. Applying style Id to only the div section, it applies to all links inside. –  user1624552 Sep 13 '13 at 17:46
    
One doubt, as far as I know, the standard css says that declaring an id in css is: element#idname so why here is switched and convention is different (#idname element)? It's asp.net not following the standard? i am a bit confusing. Could you explain me briefly? –  user1624552 Sep 13 '13 at 17:51
1  
When declaring a selector like div#hello you are specifying the type selector that is associated with that ID value. When you use the ID value followed by a space with another selector following it, you are selecting descendants of the element with the ID value. So you could also use div#myStyle a in your example. The only reason you would use the type selector before it's ID value is for specificity I would think. –  Adrift Sep 13 '13 at 17:54
1  
Many thanks, now I understand. Thanks for the links, they help me a lot. –  user1624552 Sep 13 '13 at 18:06
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Your approach was correct but you have to switch selectors in your style

#myStyle a {
    background-color:transparent;
    padding:0px;
}

will change style of all links within DIV with ID #myStyle

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Yes, it works. I have voted @Adrift because he answered first. Thanks. –  user1624552 Sep 13 '13 at 17:46
1  
Thanks for the vote! And congrats to @Adrift, let's the fastest gunslinger win :) –  Yuriy Galanter Sep 13 '13 at 17:47
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You need to use a CSS class instead of an ID, like this:

a.myStyle {
    background-color: transparent;
    padding: 0px;
}

Then you can apply the class to each anchor tag, like this:

<a class="myStyle" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
<a class="myStyle"  href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
<a class="myStyle" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
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Use a class, because you can't give the same id to more than one element :

<ul style="margin-top:10px;">

   <a class=myStyle href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a class=myStyle href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a class=myStyle href="..."><img src="..."/></a>

</ul>

Then your css becomes

a.myStyle {
    background-color: transparent;
    padding: 0px; 
}
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Try This.

<style>
.anchor
{
background-color:transparent;padding:0px;
}
</style>

<ul style="margin-top:10px;">

   <a class="anchor" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a class="anchor" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>
   <a class="anchor" href="..."><img src="..."/></a>

</ul>
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