Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I am having trouble using a JSON object outside of the AJAX success scope. I need to access the returned JSON object outside the AJAX success scope. I tried initializing a JS var outside the AJAX scope however and the assigning the JSON to it. However, this approach results in a catalog.item is undefined error. I appreciate any suggestions that will help me fix this problem.

This is what I tried:

This approach works perfectly fine (but not what I need):

            $('.catViewButton').click(function(){
                var overlay = jQuery('<div class="overlay"> </div>');
                overlay.appendTo(".invoice-body");
                $('.catalog-view-wrapper').show();
                $.ajax({
                    url: "ajax/invoice-get-data.php?loadCatalog=1",
                    dataType: "json",
                    success: function(catalog){
                        alert(catalog.item[0].image);
                         $('.catalog-img-container').attr("src", catalog.item[0].image);
                    }
                }); 

                        ...more code
                        .....
                        .....

This approach is what I need but results in an error:

        var catalog = [];
        $('.catViewButton').click(function(){
            var overlay = jQuery('<div class="overlay"> </div>');
            overlay.appendTo(".invoice-body");
            $('.catalog-view-wrapper').show();
            $.ajax({
                url: "ajax/invoice-get-data.php?loadCatalog=1",
                dataType: "json",
                success: function(cat){
                    catalog = cat;
                }
            }); 
            alert(catalog.item[0].image);
            $('.catalog-img-container').attr("src", catalog.item[0].image);
                    ...more code
                    .....
                    .....

Many thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by James Montagne, Musa, adeneo, A. Wolff, tereško Sep 13 '13 at 21:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
not a duplicate. programmer needs to understand the difference between making asynchronous and synchronous calls using jquery ajax –  Akshay Khandelwal Sep 13 '13 at 18:33
1  
@JamesMontagne - Felix sure is getting a lot of traffic on that one. –  adeneo Sep 13 '13 at 18:33
2  
@AkshayKhandelwal - It's an acronomym for "Asynchronous Javascript and XML" for a reason ! –  adeneo Sep 13 '13 at 18:34
2  
This is an example of why sync is a bad idea. jsfiddle.net/NhKps Try typing your name in the input. It isn't very smooth/enjoyable is it? –  Kevin B Sep 13 '13 at 18:42
2  
Is it a long answer? Yes. Is it a complicated answer? Maybe. Does it answer your issue? Absolutely. So reading this long answer is paramount to understanding why you are running into the problem in the first place. –  Steve Sep 13 '13 at 18:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use the Deferred Object which deals with asynchronous calls for you. Doing so your code will be executed in the reading order, no matter when the response is sent back. You can add as many callback as you need :

jqxhr = $.ajax({
    url: "ajax/invoice-get-data.php?loadCatalog=1",
    dataType: "json"
}); 
jqxhr.done(function(catalog) { 
    alert(catalog.item[0].image);
    $('.catalog-img-container').attr("src", catalog.item[0].image);
});
jqxhr.done(function(catalog) { 
    // use catalog again
});

The documentation is full of examples about all of that : http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/.

share|improve this answer

This is where the a of ajax is really important. Asynchronous means the alert and the subsequent .attr() lines are running before your success callback is run. You really should put these lines inside the success callback.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. But what if I need to use the contents of the JSON object outside the success callback? Is there a way around this? –  AnchovyLegend Sep 13 '13 at 18:34
    
@AnchovyLegend Then you must still wait until after the success callback is executed. There is no way around that. Your code doesn't necessarily HAVE to be inside the success callback, but it will need to be in a function that gets executed either by the success callback or after the success callback. –  Kevin B Sep 13 '13 at 18:36
    
@AnchovyLegend Yes, there is a way around this problem: see my answer. As several purists have pointed out, it's a kludge -- but it works. (Whether it is right for you depends on the volume of traffic your web app receives. Not every webapp is Google Mail... I use the method all the time, as do others who taught it to me.) –  gibberish Sep 13 '13 at 19:42

Look at deferred obj and .when(). You do not have to put everything in the success callback.

http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/ http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.when/

share|improve this answer

This is how AJAX works. The results returned to the success: function are local to that function.

If you need to access them outside of the success function, one option is to store them in an element - such as a hidden <input> field, like this:

Supposing a hidden input field like this:

<input type="hidden" id="myHiddenField" />

Revised AJAX

$.ajax({
    url: "ajax/invoice-get-data.php?loadCatalog=1",
    dataType: "json",
    success: function(catalog){
        $('#myHiddenField').val(catalog);
        $('#myHiddenField').trigger('blur');
    }
}); 

Outside the AJAX function:

$('#myHiddenField').blur(function() {
    var cat = $(this).val();
    //now do something with the data in var cat
});
share|improve this answer
1  
I downvoted because you modified the DOM to store JS data. You don't need to do that and it's not very efficient. –  Vlad Sep 13 '13 at 18:43
    
How else would you do it? Occam's Razor: it's simple and it works. –  gibberish Sep 13 '13 at 18:44
1  
Why would you need to store it in another element to do this? you could jus tas well have created an object, bound an event to that object, and then triggered an event there. Or better yet, used the built-in promise interface. –  Kevin B Sep 13 '13 at 18:46
2  
You can do the same with JS vars, you don't need the input. Sure it works with one and the impact on performance is not noticeable, but imagine if you did that for 1000 items. –  Vlad Sep 13 '13 at 18:48
2  
@KevinB AkshayKhandelwal Vlad - Would you mind posting your solution as an answer (or even adding onto my answer)? I didn't code my answer the way you suggest because I don't know what you know. My answer does work... and it's posted... –  gibberish Sep 13 '13 at 18:59

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.