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Looking for a bash line to take a RSS date format such as "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" and convert it into milliseconds?

I've tried things as below they they do not produce in milliseconds. I'm running Mac OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.8.

  524  date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  525  date +%s -d "Fri 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  526  date +%s -d "Fri 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45"
  527  date +%s -f "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  528  date +%s -f "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  514  date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  515  date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45"
  516  date +%s -ud "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT"
  517  date +%s -ud "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45"
  512  date -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" "+%s"
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1  
Perhaps you could clarify what you consider wrong with the outputs of those various attempts. Is it just that the timestamp is in seconds instead of milliseconds? – rici Sep 13 '13 at 19:25
    
As he is commenting on the answers given to him. He is getting date: illegal time format... That is strange ! – iamauser Sep 13 '13 at 19:32
    
Ah, Mac OS X. @Tony, I edited my answer. I don't have mac os x handy but I'm pretty sure what I wrote will work. – rici Sep 13 '13 at 19:51
    
I checked. It doesn't. It has issues with bind. date:bind:permission denied – iamauser Sep 13 '13 at 19:53
    
@iamauser: thanks. I forgot that you have to tell bsd date not to try to set the date, with the clearly mnemonic -j (just-show-me?). Updated the answer. BTW, don't you think sed and awk are overkill to just put 000 at the end of something? – rici Sep 13 '13 at 19:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does the RSS date have fractional seconds?

If not, using BSD date (i.e. Mac OS X):

echo $(date -j -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45" +%s)000

or, according to the Mac OS X manpage:

echo $(date -j -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" +%s)000

If you have GNU date, the following rather simpler expression will work:

echo $(date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT")000

Or you could use this, which will work with fractional seconds in the original time string:

echo $(($(date +%s%N -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45.126 GMT")/1000000))
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1  
echo $(date -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45" +%s)000 date: bind: Permission denied date: settimeofday (timeval): Operation not permitted 000 – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 19:51
1  
@Tony: sorry, forgot the -j. Fixed, I hope. – rici Sep 13 '13 at 19:52
    
echo $(date -j -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" +%s)000 worked! – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 20:04
    
Actually, it looks like using the line of code above always results in the Fri, 13 Sep date being translated to milliseconds vs using the actual date that should of been passed in? – Tony Oct 2 '13 at 14:35
    
@Tony: Yes, you need to pass in the date you want to convert instead of putting Friday the 13th. "$DATE" or some such. – rici Oct 2 '13 at 18:42

The date command gives you time in [s] resolution. Just append 3 zeroes, if that resolution is OK for you.

date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" | sed 's/..*/&000/'

If it's not, I'm afraid you'll have to write a C program, using the system call gettimeofday(). Let's call it gettimeofday.c:

#include <sys/time.h>                                
#include <stdio.h>                                   
int main(void)                                       
{                                                    
        struct timeval t;                            
        gettimeofday(&t, NULL);                      
        printf("%d%d\n", t.tv_sec, t.tv_usec / 1000);
        return 0;                                    
}                                                    

To compile it you need gcc and make:

make gettimeofday

And then:

./gettimeofday

On second thoughts, my little program is totally useless, since you want to convert a given date to Unix time. But I'll leave it here, because it's so nice. :-)

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Getting:" date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" | sed 's/..*/&000/' date: illegal time format usage: date [-jnu] [-d dst] [-r seconds] [-t west] [-v[+|-]val[ymwdHMS]] ... [-f fmt date | [[[mm]dd]HH]MM[[cc]yy][.ss]] [+format] " – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 19:23
    
I'm using date date (GNU coreutils) 8.13. It does work with my version. – SzG Sep 13 '13 at 19:30

You can use awk to add three zeros at the end of the output to make it in ms.

date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" | awk '{print $0"000"}'

or use sed to do the same :

date +%s -d "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" | sed -e "s|.*|&000|g"

The above don't work in Mac OS X Lion. You have to install GNU date which is in the coreutil package in MacPorts. You will then get gdate.

Instead you can use python to do this :

python -c'import time; print "%f" % (time.mktime(time.gmtime())*1000.)'
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Getting date: illegal time format – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 19:31
    
do a man date and check whether you have the option %s and -d in there... and post your OS and date version in your question. – iamauser Sep 13 '13 at 19:34
    
how do I get the date version? – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 19:37
    
I guess you are using Mac-os-X,. You can get the version by date --version – iamauser Sep 13 '13 at 19:38
    
To clarify I'm running on 10.6.8 - date --version date: illegal option -- - – Tony Sep 13 '13 at 19:41

If you get an date: illegal time format error message on Mac OS X try using LANG=C date:

- echo $(date -j -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" +%s)000  #  date: illegal time format
+ echo $(LANG=C date -j -f "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z" "Fri, 13 Sep 2013 17:16:45 GMT" +%s)000
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