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I wrote the following class for an iterator that iterates along the lines of a file.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class FileIterator implements Iterator<String> {

private BufferedReader reader;

public FileIterator(String filename) {
  this.reader = getBufferedReader(filename);
}


private static BufferedReader getBufferedReader(String filename) {

  File file = new File(filename); 
  if(file.exists()) {
    try {
          return new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                  new FileInputStream(new File(filename)),"UTF-8"));
        } catch (Exception e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
          return null;
    }
  } else {
        System.out.println(filename + " is not there");
        return null;
  }
}

public boolean hasNext() {
  try {
    return reader.ready();
  } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    return false;
  }
}

public String next() {
  try {
    return reader.readLine();
  } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    return null;
  }
}

public void remove() {}
}

Now my question is a bit naive. Will be the reader closed once the iterator is no more used, when the GC will take care of it? Would the class improve if I close the reader manually? Maybe as a side effect in the hasNext() method:

public boolean hasNext() {
  try {
        if(reader.ready()) return true;
        else {
          reader.close();
      return false;
        }
  } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    return false;
  }
}    

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Problems like these are a major part of the reason that you probably shouldn't use an Iterator like this. – Louis Wasserman Sep 13 '13 at 20:32
    
I know, but I needed a fast implementation of an Iterator<String> for an interface I had to test... Then I was wondering if I can do something else out of it. – davide Sep 13 '13 at 20:37
1  
You shouldn't do anything else with an iterator that can be created for a non-existing file, and then throw a NullPointerException when hasNext() is called. That's an awkward behavior. – eran Sep 13 '13 at 20:41
1  
By the way: throw UnsupportedOperationException from remove() – Nikos Paraskevopoulos Sep 13 '13 at 20:50
    
@davide: If you're just using a handful of Strings for a test, why not just use Arrays.asList("example1", "example2", "example3").iterator()? – Louis Wasserman Sep 13 '13 at 20:57
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you really want to do this, I would have FileIterator implement Closeable and delegate the call to the underlying BufferedReader. You could even use it in a Java 7 try-with-resources block.

share|improve this answer
    
why would he not want to do this? what else would he want to do instead? (smells like there's a best-practice somewhere) – n611x007 Feb 11 '14 at 11:40
    
Well it's a bit of an abuse of the Iterable interface because you can only iterate over it once. But so is Java's DirectoryStream so maybe it's not that bad. I have a LineIterable class that we use a lot at work so I can't say it's a horrible idea :) – Tavian Barnes Feb 11 '14 at 13:52

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