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I have the following working example AppleScript snippet:

set str to "This is a string"

set outlist to {}
repeat with wrd in words of str
    if wrd contains "is" then set end of outlist to wrd
end repeat

I know the whose clause in AppleScript can often be used to replace repeat loops such as this to significant performance gain. However in the case of text element lists such as words, characters and paragraphs I haven't been able to figure out a way to make this work.

I have tried:

set outlist to words of str whose text contains "is"

This fails with:

error "Can’t get {\"This\", \"is\", \"a\", \"string\"} whose text contains \"is\"." number -1728

, presumably because "text" is not a property of the text class. Looking at the AppleScript Reference for the text class, I see that "quoted form" is a property of the text class, so I half expected this to work:

set outlist to words of str whose quoted form contains "is"

But this also fails, with:

error "Can’t get {\"This\", \"is\", \"a\", \"string\"} whose quoted form contains \"is\"." number -1728

Is there any way to replace such a repeat loop with a whose clause in AppleScript?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From page 534 (working with text) of AppleScript 1-2-3

AppleScript does not consider paragraphs, words, and characters to be scriptable objects that can be located by using the values of their properties or elements in searches using a filter reference, or whose clause.

Here is another approach:

set str to "This is a string"
set outlist to paragraphs of (do shell script "grep -o '\\w*is\\w*' <<< " & quoted form of str)
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This is what I had feared - just not possible, at least in pure Applescript with a whose clause. The shell script approach is a decent workaround, although not quite right. It returns {"is", "is"}, instead of the full words, i.e. {"This", "is"}. However, this can probably be fixed by tweaking the grep expression. –  DigitalTrauma Sep 14 '13 at 22:56
    
Yes, just some missing quotes needed: set outlist to paragraphs of (do shell script "grep -o '\\w*is\\w*' <<< " & quoted form of str) did the trick for me - Thanks! –  DigitalTrauma Sep 14 '13 at 23:02
    
Nice Catch Atomic... –  adayzdone Sep 14 '13 at 23:04

As @adayzdone has shown. It looks like you are out of luck with that.

But you could try using the offset command like this.

    set wrd to "I am here"
        set outlist to {}

        set str to " This is a word"

  if ((offset of space & "is" & space in str) as integer) is greater than 0 then set end of outlist to wrd

Note the spaces around "is" . This makes sure Offset is finding a whole word. Offset will find the first matching "is" in "This" otherwise.

UPDATE.

To use it as the OP wants

set wrd to "I am here"
set outlist to {}

set str to " This is a word"
repeat with wrd in words of str

    if ((offset of "is" in wrd) as integer) is greater than 0 then set end of outlist to (wrd as string)
end repeat

-->{"This", "is"}

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This doesn't quite give me what I'm looking for. The example repeat loop in my question constructs outlist to be a list of all words of str which contain "is", i.e. {"This", "is"}. Unfortunately offset will only give one offset at a time. –  DigitalTrauma Sep 14 '13 at 22:54
    
This was just showing you the offset. Which if used in the same repeat loop would then search each word. But I did miss the point of your 'contains' thinking you only wanted "is". On ipad at the mo. but will update the answer for future readers –  markhunte Sep 15 '13 at 9:25
    
Updated to expand on how offset can be used to reach the OP's goal –  markhunte Sep 15 '13 at 12:19
    
Hi @markhunte, This latest edit is pretty much the repeat loop in my original question, except you use "offset of" instead of "contains". The point of the question was to figure out if there is a way to filter the input list without a repeat loop. This can be done with a whose clause for some Applescript objects, but apparently not with text elements. –  DigitalTrauma Sep 16 '13 at 15:38
    
Hi @AtomicToothbrush Yer. I seem to have had trouble reading you question. Will uncross my eyes and do better next time. ;-) –  markhunte Sep 16 '13 at 15:43

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