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I've found a number of examples showing how to select a single oldest/newest row from a grouped set, but am having trouble getting the oldest two rows from a data set.

Here's my sample table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `orderTable` (
  `customer_id` varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  `order_id` varchar(4) NOT NULL,
  `date_added` date NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`customer_id`,`order_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO `orderTable` (`customer_id`, `order_id`, `date_added`) VALUES
('1234', '5A', '1997-01-22'),
('1234', '88B', '1992-05-09'),
('0487', 'F9', '2002-01-23'),
('5799', 'A12F', '2007-01-23'),
('1234', '3A', '2009-01-22'),
('3333', '7FHS', '2009-01-22'),
('0487', 'Z33', '2004-06-23'),
('3333', 'FF44', '2013-09-11'),
('3333', '44f5', '2013-09-02');

This query returns more than two rows:

SELECT customer_id, order_id, date_added
FROM orderTable T1
WHERE (
   select count(*) FROM orderTable T2
   where T2.order_id = T1.order_id AND T2.date_added <= T1.date_added
) <= 2;

Since I am not looking for a single row, this is not a standard greatest-n-per-group type query.

What am I missing that I can get the first two orders for each customer_id?

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean LIMIT 2 and not <= 2 ? – SenorAmor Sep 13 '13 at 21:31
    
for each customer. Limiting to 2 for the entire query would not return the results I need. – a coder Sep 13 '13 at 21:33
    
@acoder, check my answer below, you want top two by customer, but you are counting rows per order_id which will return 1 for each row. – rs. Sep 13 '13 at 21:50
    
It seems your query finds 2 oldest rows for each order_id and since there is only one for each it returns all rows. Don't you need to change order_id to customer_id for the WHERE condition inside count subquery? – piotrm Sep 13 '13 at 21:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The best (i.e. most performant) approach is to use a User Defined Variable in the query.

SELECT tmp.customer_id, tmp.date_added 
FROM ( 
  SELECT 
    customer_id, date_added, 
    IF (@prev <> customer_id, @rownum := 1, @rownum := @rownum+1 ) rank,
    @prev := customer_id
  FROM orderTable t 
  JOIN (SELECT @rownum := NULL, @prev := 0) r 
  ORDER BY t.customer_id
) tmp 
WHERE tmp.rank <= 2 
ORDER BY customer_id, date_added

Results:

| CUSTOMER_ID |                       DATE_ADDED |
|-------------|----------------------------------|
|        0487 |   January, 23 2002 00:00:00+0000 |
|        0487 |      June, 23 2004 00:00:00+0000 |
|        1234 |       May, 09 1992 00:00:00+0000 |
|        1234 |   January, 22 1997 00:00:00+0000 |
|        3333 |   January, 22 2009 00:00:00+0000 |
|        3333 | September, 02 2013 00:00:00+0000 |
|        5799 |   January, 23 2007 00:00:00+0000 |

Fiddle here.

Note that the join is just being used to initialise the variables.

share|improve this answer

Your original query should be (use customer_id in subquery)

SELECT customer_id, order_id, date_added
FROM orderTable T1
WHERE (
   select count(*) FROM orderTable T2
   where T2.customer_id = T1.customer_id AND T2.date_added <= T1.date_added
) <= 2;

You can also use variables:

SELECT customer_id, order_id, date_added FROM (
SELECT customer_id, order_id, date_added,
@rownum := if(@prev_cust = customer_id, @rownum + 1,1) as rn,
@prev_cust := customer_id cust_var
FROM orderTable T1,
  (SELECT @rownum := 0) r,
  (SELECT @prev_cust := '') c
order by customer_id, date_added 
) o where o.rn < 3;

SQL DEMO

share|improve this answer

Here's another (deliberately incomplete) method, though others may have a point about performance...

SELECT x.*
     , COUNT(*) rank 
  FROM ordertable x 
  JOIN ordertable y 
    ON y.customer_id = x.customer_id 
   AND y.date_added <= x.date_added 
 GROUP 
    BY x.customer_id 
     , x.date_added;
share|improve this answer
    
Quick (Off topic) comment on your formatting, never seen the commas dropped around like this, or the reserved words aligned in a single column.. it's surprisingly easy to read. – a coder Sep 13 '13 at 21:54
    
:-) I think it's called 'centre aligned'. It has its detractors, but I like it :-) – Strawberry Sep 17 '13 at 18:21

This should produce the results you're after, but the outer SELECT won't be the most efficient as it's filtering on a derived table.

SELECT ranked.* 
FROM (
    SELECT ot.* , 
        @rownum := IF( ot.customer_id = @previous , @rownum +1, 1 ) rank, 
        @previous := ot.customer_id
    FROM orderTable ot, 
        (SELECT @rownum :=1, @previous := NULL) init
    ORDER BY customer_id, date_added
) ranked
WHERE rank <=2
share|improve this answer

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