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I'm trying to get the following to work. I have a table with the Fields FirstName, LastName and DoctorId. I would like to populate a .net ListBox using Linq to SQL. Here's what I have found and borrowed:

In a class I've called DALClass:

public List<Doctor> GetListDoctorsNames()
{
  using (var db = new WaitListDataContext())
  {
    return (from c in db.Doctors
            select new
            {
              FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
              DoctorId = c.DoctorId
            }
            ).ToList<Doctor>;
  }
}

The error has to do with the ").ToList;" line. The error is:

Error 1 Cannot convert method group 'ToList' to non-delegate type 'System.Collections.Generic.List'. Did you intend to invoke the method? Q:\myapp\WaitList\App_Code\DALClass.cs 37 16 Q:\myapp\WaitList\

I'm not sure if I'm supposed to put <String> instead of <Doctor>. I have tried that and it doesn't work.

share|improve this question
    
Try .ToList<Doctor>(); –  hatchet Sep 13 '13 at 22:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your query is returning an anonymous type, and you're not actually invoking the ToList method. You probably need to specify the data type select clause, and invoke ToList method using parentheses, like this:

return 
    (from c in db.Doctors
     select new Doctor
     {
        FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
        DoctorId = c.DoctorId
     })
    .ToList<Doctor>(); // or just .ToList();

Update

To address the second error ("'Doctor' does not contain a definition for 'FullName'") the problem is that you haven't defined any such property on your Doctor.

You could try to define a separate property on Doctor, but I'm not sure if Linq-to-SQL will allow that. You could also reuse one of the existing properties (e.g. LastName), but that doesn't sound particularly elegant.

I'd recommend designing a separate entity (usually you'd accomplish this with an anonymous type but since it appears you're returning this from a method, that's not an option if you care about type safety):

public class DisplayDoctor
{
    public string FullName { get; set; }
    public int DoctorId { get; set; }
}

return 
    (from c in db.Doctors
     select new DisplayDoctor
     {
        FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
        DoctorId = c.DoctorId
     })
    .ToList<DisplayDoctor>(); // or just .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
This must be close. However, the error is, "'Doctor' does not contain a definition for 'FullName'". –  user995727 Sep 13 '13 at 22:31
    
@user995727 See my updated answer –  p.s.w.g Sep 13 '13 at 22:38
    
Thank you! That was it. I did not have the property "FullName". Creating a class that to hold just the fullname and id is perfect. Thank you so much for your help! –  user995727 Sep 13 '13 at 22:46

I'm assuming the Doctor class is actually an entity from the database context. In that case you need to create your own type and return that rather than Doctor.

public List<MyDoctor> GetListDoctorsNames()
{
  using (var db = new WaitListDataContext())
  {
      return db.Doctors.Select(c => new MyDoctor()
             {
                 FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
                 DoctorId = c.DoctorId
             }).ToList();
  }
}

public class MyDoctor
{
  public string FullName {get; set;} 
  public int DoctorId {get; set;} //Or what ever type DoctorId is
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are correct! I needed a class to hold the property FullName as my Linq to SQL class didn't have one. Thank you so much. I learned a lot from your code. –  user995727 Sep 13 '13 at 22:47

The first problem, ToList() is a method and needs to be called as one:

).ToList<Doctor>();

Second, you won't be able to cast an anonymous type to a Doctor class. What you want is:

  return (from c in db.Doctors
            select new Doctor() // Create Doctor instance
            {
              FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
              DoctorId = c.DoctorId
            }
          ).ToList(); // No longer a need to specify type on generic method

Update: If it were me, I'd just update the Doctor class (the auto-generated models are partial classes anyway) to have a FullName property like so:

public partial class Doctor
{
   public string FullName // Read only FullName property
   {
      get
      {
         return this.FirstName + " " + this.LastName;
      }
   }
}

Then, you can just return your list of Doctor objects (I'm assuming db.Doctors is a collection of Doctor objects):

  return (from c in db.Doctors select c).ToList();

And bind directly to the FullName property of the object.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have a property, "FullName". I just made the up to try and solve this problem. A Doctor doesn't have "FullName". Should I try something else to try and solve my original problem of populating a ListBox with the complete name of a doctor? –  user995727 Sep 13 '13 at 22:38
    
@user995727 - Ah, I think I see. I've updated my answer. –  Mike Christensen Sep 13 '13 at 22:50

I believe you're simply missing the parentheses indicating you are trying to execute the ToList<>() method :)

using (var db = new WaitListDataContext())
{
  return (from c in db.Doctors
        select new
        {
          FullName = c.FirstName + " " + c.LastName,
          DoctorId = c.DoctorId
        }
      ).ToList<Doctor>();

}

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to be closer. Now the error reads, "Error 1 'Doctor' does not contain a definition for 'FullName'". Is the Select statement incorrect? –  user995727 Sep 13 '13 at 22:28

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