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Let's say I have this

typedef struct qwerty {
    void *f;
} qwerty_t;

and I want to do this

static qwerty_t x    = {
    .f = (void *)some_external_function
};

I'm getting error: initializer element is not constant because (if I understand correctly) the direction of some_external_function is unknown when I'm compiling.

If that is not the correct explanation of the error, please explain what is.

Also, how can I initialize .f to the direction of that function?

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Please someone correct me on this, but isn't casting function pointers UB. >>f = (void *)some_function –  this Sep 14 '13 at 0:28
    
@self.: In standard C, yes — there is no guarantee that a function pointer will fit into a data pointer. However, fortunately, POSIX steps in and mandates that the size of data pointers is the same as the size of function pointers — sizeof(void *) == sizeof(void (*)(void)). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '13 at 0:39
1  
Can you show the declaration of some_external_function? If, for example, it is itself a function pointer, not an actual function, you would get that error. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '13 at 0:41
    
@JonathanLeffler indeed, you're right. I was doing exactly that. Now it's fixed :) I should have tried with a simple POC before asking here. Thank you for the help anyways –  alexandernst Sep 14 '13 at 0:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the comments to the question:

  1. You don't show the declaration of some_external_function? If, for example, it is itself a function pointer, not an actual function, you would get that error. — Jonathan Leffler

  2. Indeed, you're right. I was doing exactly that. — alexandernst

I'm not sure it's definitive, but... GCC 4.8.1 on Mac OS X 10.8.4 accepts this code OK:

extern int some_external_function(int, int);

typedef struct qwerty {
    void *f;
} qwerty_t;

static qwerty_t x    = {
    .f = (void *)some_external_function
};

int main(void)
{
    int i = 1;
    int j = 2;
    int (*f)(int, int) = (int (*)(int, int))x.f;
    return f(i, j);
}

int some_external_function(int i, int j)
{
    return i + j;
}

When compiled 'extra fussy' like this, you get some warnings:

$ gcc -std=c99   -Wall -Wextra -pedantic fp.c -o fp  
fp.c:8:14: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to object pointer type [-Wpedantic]
         .f = (void *)some_external_function
              ^
fp.c: In function ‘main’:
fp.c:15:26: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of object pointer to function pointer type [-Wpedantic]
     int (*f)(int, int) = (int (*)(int, int))x.f;
                          ^
$

The warnings are pedantically accurate — but POSIX states that the size of a function pointer must be the same as the size of a data pointer (whereas the C standard permits them to differ). Without -pedantic, there are no warnings.

Splitting the code into two files, one with definitions of x and main() and the other with the definition of some_external_function(), and compiling and linking yields no errors and no new warnings.

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I was thinking about this and... If I wanted to initialize a member to a function pointer, would it be possible? And how? –  alexandernst Sep 15 '13 at 17:10
    
In C99, you might use designated initializers like this: struct math_func { double x; double (*func)(double); } info = { .func = sin, .x = 0.0 };. Is that answering what you're after? (If not, please clarify your question in your comment.) –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '13 at 17:12
    
Is it mandatory to know the returning type of the function? –  alexandernst Sep 15 '13 at 17:18
    
It depends on how sloppy your C programming is. How are you going to call the function successfully if you don't know the type of the value it returns? If you're going to ignore the return value, the function should return void, and the function pointer can require that. What's your use case? Are you suffering from an XY Problem? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '13 at 17:20
    
Yes, I guess I'm in a XY Problem, kind of. Let me create another question to keep this clean. Here: stackoverflow.com/questions/18815440 –  alexandernst Sep 15 '13 at 17:41
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This is likely because you are defining the static keyword for the x. Basically, C requires you to associate a static storage with a constant expression or value. Even something as simple as below would give you the same error:

int main() {
   int y = 10;
   static int z = y;
}
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Yeah, I thought that too, but I get the same thing even if I remove static. –  alexandernst Sep 14 '13 at 0:30
    
I tried removing static and defining the some_external_function (in the same file, ofcourse) and I did not run into this error. In addition, I quickly tried by including some_external_function in an external header file and I did not run into this issue as well. I am using gcc 4.2.1 on Mac OS. –  Manoj Pandey Sep 14 '13 at 0:34
    
Mac OS? As in "classic Mac OS"? Kudos to the binutils and gcc authors and contributors on it working on such an old platform! I haven't used that since I was a kid... Suddenly I miss Math Blaster... :-P –  Chrono Kitsune Sep 14 '13 at 0:40
    
For nitpickers like you, that would be Max OS X 10.7.5 :-) –  Manoj Pandey Sep 14 '13 at 0:46
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