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Can you please tell me why the parent-child relationship needs to be appended inside the for loop to get the expected output. I am not understanding scope in Python.

#a unique id to be given to each node
current_id = 0
#ids = [parent_id, current_id]; stores parent_child tree data
ids = []
#MWE of depth first search
def bt(parent_id):
   global ids
   global current_id
   #increament current id because we just created a new node
   current_id = current_id +1
   #store the parent to child relationship in the list called ids
   ids.append([parent_id,current_id]) 
   #show the parent child relationship that is getting append to the ids list
   print 'parent-child (outside loop)', [parent_id,current_id]
   if(parent_id) > 1:
       return
   for i in range(2):
        print 'parent-child (inside loop)', [parent_id,current_id]
        bt(current_id)
#run depth first search
print bt(0)
#print list of parent to child relationships
print 'list of parent-child relationships\n',ids
print 'expected output',[[0,1],[1,2],[1,3],[0,4]]

EDIT: The output of this script is:

parent-child (outside loop) [0, 1]
parent-child (inside loop) [0, 1]
parent-child (outside loop) [1, 2]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 2]
parent-child (outside loop) [2, 3]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 3]
parent-child (outside loop) [3, 4]
parent-child (inside loop) [0, 4]
parent-child (outside loop) [4, 5]
None
list of parent-child relationships
[[0, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 4], [4, 5]]
expected output [[0, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3], [0, 4]]
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1  
What do you expect to happen? What happens instead? –  BrenBarn Sep 14 '13 at 1:52
    
The expected output is given on the last line: "Print 'expected output',...[0,4]]". The output I am getting is given on the line above: "print 'list of parent-...,ids" –  John Sep 14 '13 at 1:56
    
This has nothing to do with scope and everything to do with the lines if(parent_id) > 1: return. The reason the "outside loop" and "inside loop" look different on the third iteration isn't that one is inside a loop, it's when the parent id reaches 1 it returns. –  David Robinson Sep 14 '13 at 1:57
    
Put another way: how could you possibly have a pair that differed by more than one, like [1, 3] or [0, 4]? Your two lines current_id = current_id +1; ids.append([parent_id,current_id]) are right next to each other, and the function is always called with the current_id (which means that parent_id == current_id at the start of the function) –  David Robinson Sep 14 '13 at 2:00
    
@DavidRobinson Because the parent is creating multiple children. For example, the parent with the current_id = 0 is creating two children, one of the children should have a current_id = 1 and the another with a current_id = 4 –  John Sep 14 '13 at 2:10
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe the issue you're having is due to using a global variable for current_id. When you create a child in the recursive call, current_id gets updated for the parent's call too.

Here's a simpler example:

 x = 0
 def foo(level=0):
     global x
     print(" "*level+str(x))
     x += 1
     if level < 3:
         foo(level+1)
     print(" "*level+str(x))
 foo()

This will print:

 0
  1
   2
    3
    4
   4
  4
 4

The indentation indicates the level of recursion, thanks to the level parameter. The value of x gets increased by each recursive call, but it doesn't go back down when the calls unwind. That's because it's a global variable, so the changes made by the inner levels of recursion are seen by the outer levels.

In your code, you can fix this by keeping a reference to the original current_id value in a local variable:

def bt(parent_id):
   global current_id
   current_id = current_id +1
   ids.append([parent_id,current_id])

   my_id = current_id # make a local reference to the current_id

   print('parent-child (outside loop)', [parent_id,my_id])
   if(parent_id) > 1:
       return
   for i in range(2):
        print('parent-child (inside loop)', [parent_id,my_id])
        bt(my_id) # use the local reference for the recursion

The output is still not exactly what you are expecting, but it makes sense:

parent-child (outside loop) [0, 1]
parent-child (inside loop) [0, 1]
parent-child (outside loop) [1, 2]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 2]
parent-child (outside loop) [2, 3]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 2]
parent-child (outside loop) [2, 4]
parent-child (inside loop) [0, 1]
parent-child (outside loop) [1, 5]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 5]
parent-child (outside loop) [5, 6]
parent-child (inside loop) [1, 5]
parent-child (outside loop) [5, 7]
None
list of parent-child relationships
[[0, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3], [2, 4], [1, 5], [5, 6], [5, 7]]
expected output [[0, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3], [0, 4]]

If you were to make a diagram showing the tree organization you've build in ids, you'd get:

    (0)  # This is not a real element, but the root's "parent"
     |
     1
    / \
   /   \
  2     5
 / \   / \
3   4 6   7 
share|improve this answer
    
Your "simpler example" really shows your expertise because it was both concise and highly explanatory. –  John Sep 14 '13 at 4:42
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