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I'm interested in creating a function that uses a queue as part of its implementation, but I want to be templated on the type of queue so that it will have different functionality based on what type of queue its templated with.

Here's a basic example:

template <typename Queue>
void example()
{
  Queue a;
  a.push(3);
  a.push(1);
  a.push(2);
  while (!a.empty()) {
    cout << a.top() << ' ';
    a.pop();
  }
  cout << flush;
}

What I want is for example<stack<int>>() to print 2 1 3, example<priority_queue<int>>() to print 3 2 1, and example<queue<int>>() to print 3 1 2. This works for stack and priority_queue but unfortunately queue doesn't provide top and instead provides front. Is there an easy way to tell the compiler when it sees top on a queue to call front instead?

The only way around this that I can think of is to follow this question How to implement generic method for STL containers that haven`t common interface needed for that method using template template parameter, and implement my own local top for each of the data types and call that instead. This solution seems super inelegant though, and I'd rather find another way if possible.

Edit: I am using a compiler that supports C++11, gcc 4.7.0 to be exact.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Assuming the presence of a top() and a front() member are mutually exclusive, you could create a suitable top() helper function which is overloaded on the presence of the respective member:

 template <typename Queue>
 auto top(Queue const& queue) -> decltype((queue.top()))
 {
     return queue.top();
 }

 template <typename Queue>
 auto top(Queue const& queue) -> decltype((queue.front()))
 {
     return queue.front();
 }

You can then just use top(a) to access the current top even if the top is called front(). This won't work, however, if a queue has both front() and top(). A simple fix to this problem is to make the choice of the front() version just a bit less attractive to call so it is called if it is the only version but it isn't called if both top() and front() are available. For example:

 template <typename Queue>
 auto top(Queue const& queue, bool) -> decltype((queue.top()))
 {
     return queue.top();
 }

 template <typename Queue>
 auto top(Queue const& queue, int) -> decltype((queue.front()))
 {
     return queue.front();
 }

... and then get access to the top element using top(a, true).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I missed the double parentheses in my comment :) -- Why not provide a default argument for those additional parameters (or even use an ellipsis)? – dyp Sep 14 '13 at 3:09
1  
@DyP: The extra argument can't be defaulted as both calls would still be good enough. I had tried to use ellipsis as I thought that would the choice obvious but I think an alternative is only preferred if an argument would ellipsis. Using the extra argument works reliably although it isn't pretty. The presence of top() could be made a type trait and then std::enable_if could be used to provide the correct choice but I was too lazy to type that option out... – Dietmar Kühl Sep 14 '13 at 3:15
1  
Right.. for some reason, I thought default arguments would participate in overload resolution. Using an additional template parameter pack however works, if there are only two overloads to select from template<class T, class...TT>auto top(T const& p, TT...)->decltype((p.top())); – dyp Sep 14 '13 at 3:30
    
This is certainly the most elegant syntax possible for SFINAE. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '13 at 15:52
    
In general they don't support both top and front, so this solution does work. It still doesn't seem like the most ideal, but it's certainly much better than the alternatives I've seen. Thanks! – Erik Sep 14 '13 at 15:56

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