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I have this C code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(){
    char *bitstr;

    printf("Enter a bitstring or q for quit: ");
    scanf("%s", &bitstr);
    return 0;
}

I keep receive the following error. What am I doing wrong?

warning: format '%s' expects argument of type 'char *', but 
argument 2 has type 'char **' [-Wformat]
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7  
error msg seems self-explanatory... –  Mitch Wheat Sep 14 '13 at 3:19
    
You also need to initialize bitstr with malloc(). –  Barmar Sep 14 '13 at 3:21
2  
possible duplicate of format ‘%s’ expects argument of type ‘char *’ –  Raymond Chen Sep 14 '13 at 3:23
    
c-faq.com/stdio/scanf1a.html –  jamesdlin Sep 14 '13 at 20:41
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2 Answers

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define MAX 100

int main(){
    char bitstr[MAX] = "";

    printf("Enter a bitstring or q for quit: ");
    scanf("%s", &bitstr);

    // or fgets(bitstr);

    return 0;
}

Try to define or allocate the size of your string/char array.

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3  
#define 100 MAX should be #define MAX 100, and suggest fgets(); instead of gets(bitstr); and scanf("%s", &bitstr); –  Grijesh Chauhan Sep 14 '13 at 5:06
    
sorry, I don't have compiler to test it but thanks!.=D –  Christian Mark Sep 14 '13 at 20:25
    
Nope. &bitstr is of type char (*)[100]; %s requires an argument of type char*. Drop the &: scanf("%s", bitstr); bitstr is of array type, and it decays to a pointer to the array's first element. Important note: Both scanf("%s", ...) and gets() are inherently unsafe, so much so that gets has been dropped from the language. They cannot guard against overly long input. –  Keith Thompson Sep 14 '13 at 21:20
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1 Pass address of a char array in scanf() and not the address of a char*.
2 Insure you do not overwrite your destination buffer.
3 Right-size your buffer needs. It is apparent from other posts you want a binary textual representation of an int. Let's assume your int is 8 bytes (64 bits).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(){
    char bitstr[8*8 + 1];  // size to a bit representation of a big integer.
    printf("Enter a bitstring or q for quit: ");
    //Change format and pass bitscr, this results in the address of bitscr array.
    scanf("%64s", bitstr);
    return 0;
}

I prefer the fgets() & sscanf() method.

char buf[100];  // You can re-use this buffer for other inputs.
if (fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), stdin) == NULL) { ; /*handle error or EOF */ }
sscanf(buf, "%64s", bitstr);        
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