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I have this :

  • Cat = 1 Dog = 2 Mouse = 4 House = 8 Ball = 16 Music = 32

And if i am getting an value from SQL = 3 -I want the output as "Cat, Dog" If value = 7 then "Cat, Dog, Mouse" and soo on.

Any help?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by I4V, Shankar Damodaran, Kon, madth3, Joel Coehoorn Sep 15 '13 at 5:06

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This is soo confusing! –  OneFineDay Sep 14 '13 at 3:36
1  
This would make more sense if you were dealing with a flag enum, I think. –  Tim Sep 14 '13 at 3:39

3 Answers 3

up vote -3 down vote accepted

You can use linq where to check if the number is less or equal to the specified value.

Dictionary<int, string> wordList = new Dictionary<int, string> {
            {1, "Cat"},
            {2, "Dog"},
            {4, "Mouse"},
            {8, "House"},
            {16, "Ball"},
            {32, "Music"},
        };

        int number = 7;

        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (KeyValuePair<int, string> word in 
            wordList.Where(pair => pair.Key <= number)) {
            builder.Append(word.Value);
            builder.Append(", ");
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Less than unfortunately doesn't work in this case. If valueFromSQL = 6 it should arguably not print Cat. –  Zong Zheng Li Sep 14 '13 at 4:03
    
Thanks Lambda, works fine if i give odd numbers, but when i give 2 or 8 gives me back only Cat, Dog, Mouse. Need 8=House –  user2778395 Sep 14 '13 at 4:24
    
Thanks @user2778395, I changed it from less than to less than or equal to it will work. –  Lambda λ Sep 14 '13 at 4:31

http://ideone.com/aPqPqE

[System.Flags]
enum Things { Cat = 1, Dog = 2, Mouse = 4, House = 8, Ball = 16, Music = 32 }

class Program
{

    static void Main()
    {

        var value = Things.Cat | Things.Dog;

        Console.WriteLine(value.ToString());
     }
}
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1  
Amazing! Never knew about this. –  Zong Zheng Li Sep 14 '13 at 4:16
2  
Wow, who would downvote this answer? And why wasn't it accepted? Did one of the two other posters actually downvote to promote their (relatively low quality) answer? Needlessly to say, the accepted answer is pretty bad. –  Zong Zheng Li Sep 14 '13 at 5:03

Assuming we have enum Item = { Cat = 1, ... }:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

foreach(Item i in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Item))) 
    if ((valueFromSQL & ((int)i)) != 0) {
        if (sb.Length > 0)
            sb.Append(", ");
        sb.Append(i);
    }

string result = sb.ToString();

This handles zero and single values (eg. valueFromSQL = 4) correctly. It works because the bit representation of the values are the following:

Name          Decimal   Binary

Cat           1         ...0001
Dog           2         ...0010
Mouse         4         ...0100
valueFromSQL  3         ...0011

Notice each Item value uses only a single unique bit. When you add these values, you effectively OR the bits together. Thus we can use bitwise AND to test whether the bit for a specific value is non-zero.

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@nietaki I think you would still need to specify the values. IIRC C# just uses sequential integers. –  Zong Zheng Li Sep 14 '13 at 4:07
    
Could the downvoter explain? –  Zong Zheng Li Sep 14 '13 at 4:09

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