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I am using "draggable" directive to support image dragging. However, as per the role of the user, I need to disable image dragging for certain groups of users. I have used following code.

<!--draggable attribute is used as handle to make it draggable using jquery event-->           
<li  ng-repeat="template in templates" draggable id="{{template._id}}" type="template" class="template-box">            
<!-- Images and other fields are child of "li" tag which can be dragged.-->                    
</li> 

The method dragSupported is in the template scope and returns true or false. I don't want to create two big duplicate <li> elements by using ng-if for each value returned by dragSupported(). In other words, I am not looking for the following approach to solve this.

<!--draggable attribute is used as handle to make it draggable using jquery event-->           
<li ng-if="dragSupported() ==true"  ng-repeat="template in templates" draggable id="{{template._id}}" type="template" class="template-box">            
<!-- Images and other fields are child of "li" tag which can be dragged.-->                    
</li>
<!--remove "draggable" directive as user doesn't have permission to drag file -->
<li ng-if="dragSupported() !=true"  ng-repeat="template in templates"  id="{{template._id}}" type="template" class="template-box">            
<!-- Images and other fields are child of "li" tag which can be dragged.-->                    
</li>

Is there any other approach to avoid code duplicity?

share|improve this question
    
Bind your dragSupported function into the directive's scope with "&" and check it in the link function. Or add an attribute to the directive that you can use to do the same. – aet Sep 14 '13 at 5:15
    
I would suggest put a checking in directive to make it draggable or not using this drag supported function. – ssilas777 Sep 14 '13 at 5:16
up vote 24 down vote accepted

JSFiddle

This functionality comes packaged with Angular as the dynamically-titled ng-attr-<attrName> directive. In your case, the code might look like this:

<li
    id="{{template._id}}"
    class="template-box"
    type="template"
    ng-repeat="template in templates"
    ng-attr-draggable="dragSupported() === true"
></li>

The JSFiddle contains examples of usage for the following values: true, false, undefined, null, 1, 0, and "". Note how typically-falsey values may yield unexpected results.

share|improve this answer
    
I liked this approach. In my new development I am using this approach. Thanks for sharing. – joy May 3 '15 at 21:29
3  
What if your attribute has parameters passed into it? – Jamie Street Aug 20 '15 at 14:11
    
@JamieStreet What is the use case? I have yet to come across a situation that requires this. – Walter Roman Aug 20 '15 at 15:06
2  
I can't get this code to work... Here's a jsFiddle: jsfiddle.net/thsd0vfc/1. For me when I use curly brackets the attr is always added whether or not the value exists in the scope. And when I don't use brackets, the attr is never added. Am I missing something? – MonsieurNinja Sep 28 '15 at 15:04
    
@MonsieurNinja Try taking a look at my updated answer. – Walter Roman Oct 14 '15 at 19:01

There is no way to directly add or remove an attribute from an element. However, you could create a directive that simply adds the attribute to the element when the condition is met. I've put something together that illustrates the approach.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/VQfcP/31/

Directive

myApp.directive('myDirective', function () {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    scope: {
        canDrag: '&'
    },
    link: function (scope, el, attrs, controller) {
        /*
$parent.$index is ugly, and it's due to the fact that the ng-repeat is being evaluated 
first, and then the directive is being applied to the result of the current iteration      
of the repeater.  You may be able to clean this by transcluding the repeat into the 
directive, but that may be an inappropriate separation of concerns. 
You will need to figure out the best way to handle this, if you want to use this approach.  
  */
        if (scope.canDrag&& scope.canDrag({idx: scope.$parent.$index})) {
            angular.element(el).attr("draggable", "draggable");
        }
    }
  };
});

HTML

<ul>
    <!-- same deal with $parent -->
    <li ng-repeat="x in [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]" my-directive="true" can-drag="checkPermissions(idx)">{{$parent.x}}</li>
</ul>

Controller

function Ctl($scope) {
   $scope.checkPermissions = function(idx) {
     // do whatever you need to check permissions
     // return true to add the attribute
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Thanks Jason for your suggestion. I took little different approach here. Since I don't want to change the "scope" variable therefore I used "attrs" to check if drag is allowed or not. Following is approach I tool which seems good so far.

Directive code:

app.directive('draggable', function () {
    return {
        // A = attribute, E = Element, C = Class and M = HTML Comment
        restrict: 'A',
        replace:true,
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {

            if(attrs.allowdrag =="true")
            {
                element.draggable({
                cursor: 'move',
                helper: 'clone',
                class:'drag-file'
                });
            }

        }
    }
});

HTML Code:

<ul> 
         <!--draggable attribute is used as handle to make it draggable using jquery event-->           
        <li  ng-repeat="template in templates" draggable allowdrag="{{userHasPrivilege()}}" >            
                <!--Ohter code part of li tag-->                   

        </li> 

</ul>

Controller is having implementation of userHasPrivilege().

Not sure if this is correct way or not. Looking for thoughts.

share|improve this answer
    
If you have the userHasPrivilege() function in the scope then you can just use it in the directive without needing to send it as an attribute of it. – will824 Sep 2 '14 at 19:16
2  
@will824 That defeats the purpose of having the directive as generic as possible, since you'd be forced to define that function wherever the directive is used. – Potecaru Tudor Sep 5 '14 at 10:45

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