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I have a template class in C++ (somewhat simplified):

template<typename T>
struct C
{
  T member;
  void set(const &T x) { member = x; }
  void set(int x) { member = x; }
};

As you can see the set() function can be called either with the type T, or with an int. This works fine unless T is an int, in which case I get an ambiguous conversion error. I understand why this is happening, but is there any way to implement what I want?

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3  
Why would you want to do this? The function with the template parameter will do what you want. –  anon Dec 10 '09 at 9:48
    
I want to do it because I want to make objects that act as numbers. In particular I want to always be able to write x = 0; It gets a bit messy because of all the possible ways numbers can change type. –  uekstrom Dec 10 '09 at 9:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way around this would be to provide a specialisation of the template for int that only has one set function. Otherwise you might want to have a look at the Boost libraries if something like enable_if in their template meta programming code would allow you to turn on the function set(int x)only when T is not of type int.

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Provide a specialisation for int:

template<>
struct C<int>
{
  int member;
  void set(int x) { member = x };
};

?

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Nice - I forgot about these. –  Preet Sangha Dec 10 '09 at 9:48

could you cast the call to either int or const int in the calling code?

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It depends what you're really trying to do. Your example as written doesn't make much sense as you're trying to set member, which is a T, from x, which is an int. While there are cases that may make sense I suspect in your real code you're setting something else.

Does the method have to have the same name? If so why? Does specialising the struct for int make sense? What other constraints do you have?

Perhaps this would work for you:

template<typename T>
struct C
{
  T member;
  template<typename U>
  void set(const U& x) { member = x; }
  void set(int x) { member = x; }
};

Now set(int) overloads set(const U&). set(const U&) accepts non T parameters, but will probably fail when you try to assign to X. It may allow more conversions than set( const T&).

If that's not good enough, adding an extra level of indirection should do the trick:

template<typename T>
struct C
{
  T member;
  void set(const T& x) { setInternal( x ); }

private:
  template<typename U>  
  void setInternal(const U& x) { member = x; }
  void setInternal(int x) { member = x; }
};
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Yeah, so, ok, I should have given more details. I want to make a class that pretends to be a number. There are many subtle traps here, for example you can get silent double->int conversions which can be very bad. In my example member is always a number (float, double, high precision float etc). template<typename U> void setInternal(const U& x) { member = x; } This is a bit too promiscuous, I was trying it but it can lead to some hard to detect bugs. –  uekstrom Dec 10 '09 at 11:11

It appears that you want to make the set method available only if the argument is T or int. However, if you just specialize C for int, all the implicit conversions still happen, just as if you didn't attempt to treat int type in a special way at all.

If you really want to disable implicit conversions, one way is with boost::enable_if - make the method only available, if the criteria are satisfied.

#include <boost/type_traits/is_same.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

template<typename T>
struct C
{
    T member;
    template <class U>
    typename boost::enable_if_c<
        boost::is_same<T, U>::value || boost::is_same<U, int>::value
    >::type
    set(const U& x) { member = x; }
};


int main()
{
    C<int> i;
    i.set(3.14); //error
    i.set(10);   //OK
    i.set('a');  //error

    C<double> d;
    d.set(3.14);  //OK
    d.set(3.14f); //error
    d.set(10);    //OK
    d.set('a');   //error
}

To achieve the same result without boost::enable_if (or implementing it yourself), you might also need to make all unwanted versions of set private (C++0x also allows to delete these overloads).

template<typename T>
struct C
{
    T member;

    void set(const T& x) { member = x; }
    void set(int x) { member = x; }
private:
    template <class U>
    void set(const U&);
};

template <>
struct C<int>
{
    int member;
    void set(int x) { member = x; }
private:
    template <class U>
    void set(const U&);
};


int main()
{
    C<int> i;
    i.set(3.14); //error
    i.set(10);   //OK
    i.set('a');  //error

    C<double> d;
    d.set(3.14);  //OK
    d.set(3.14f); //error
    d.set(10);    //OK
    d.set('a');   //error
}

However, making this exception for int seems rather arbitrary to me. Conversions from int might not be particularly safe, either, e.g int->float might lose precision for large values, int->short / int->char / int->unsigned might overflow.

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