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My url is something such as: "inventory.php?sorting=1" and so forth. Page loads fine but does not display the information properly.

mysql_connect("localhost","user","pass"); 
mysql_select_db("database"); 

if ($sorting == 1){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY year DSC");
}
elseif ($sorting == 2){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY make DSC");
}
elseif ($sorting == 3){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY miles DSC");
}
elseif ($sorting == 4){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY downpay DSC");
}
elseif ($sorting == 5){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY pricepay DSC");
}
elseif ($sorting == 6){
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY pricecash DSC");
}
else {
$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles");
}

while($r=mysql_fetch_array($result))
share|improve this question
    
In you SQL-Statements there should be "DESC" instead of "DSC". –  halfdan Dec 10 '09 at 10:01
4  
Doesn't want to work is not a problem description! –  SilentGhost Dec 10 '09 at 10:02
    
You should have superglobals turned off! –  Justin Johnson Dec 10 '09 at 11:24
    
Sorry, but "Page loads fine but does not display the information properly" is hardly any better than "Doesn't want to work". Given the answers, everyone is assuming this should read "the results are not sorted as expected"? –  Arjan Dec 10 '09 at 11:27
    
@Justin: it's not possible to turn off superglobals, I think it's register_globals that you're justly condemning. –  SilentGhost Dec 10 '09 at 12:52

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to replace $sorting with $_GET["sorting"]

but, also:

Would it not be a better idea to use the switch statement?

switch($_GET["sorting"]{
    case 1:
	$result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY year DSC");
	break;
case 2:

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, switch would make this soooo much easier :-) –  Ben Everard Dec 10 '09 at 10:01
    
Other solutions explain the potential of using $sorting = $_GET["sorting"]; - but you can save code space by simple switching on the $_GET["sorting"]; - no need to waste another var name for something that is immutable. –  Daniel May Dec 10 '09 at 10:05
    
+1 for finding the problem and suggesting switch (@Daniel - yep, variable names are a very limited resource. Save those variables! ;) ) –  Dominic Rodger Dec 10 '09 at 10:32
    
Must be my memory management woes kicking in there ;) –  Daniel May Dec 10 '09 at 10:38
    
I find that using $_GET['...'] can get ugly sometimes, like when you're using get variables as indexes to arrays and have nested []'s. –  Carson Myers Dec 10 '09 at 11:14

Why not just use the field name as the GET variable?

$sortField = $_GET['sorting'];
// Ensure we don't get any SQL injection:
$validFields = array('year', 'make', 'miles' ... 'pricecash');


$sql = "select * from vehicles";

if(in_array($sortField, $validFields)){
    $sql .= ' ORDER BY ' . $sortField .' DESC';
}

mysql_query($sql);

and then access the page using inventory.php?sorting=year etc.

This makes the URL more readable, predicatable and means you can support new fields by just adding them to the array without needing to write new switch cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Although this was not the question, +1 for a really useful answer. –  Heinzi Dec 10 '09 at 10:22
    
+1 for a neat solution (and for finding the problem, which is that the OP was using $sorting instead of $_GET["sorting"]). –  Dominic Rodger Dec 10 '09 at 10:35
    
-1 for SQL injection like "inventory.php?sorting=year;drop database;" See, for example, mysql_real_escape_string at php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-real-escape-string.php –  Arjan Dec 10 '09 at 11:11
1  
sql injection won't work in this case, because he checks that the get variable exists in an array. Unless the OP put year;drop database etc into the array. –  Carson Myers Dec 10 '09 at 11:17
1  
in_array tests if a array contains a specific value. I think you meant array_key_exists. –  Gumbo Dec 10 '09 at 11:18

Short answer: Replace $sorting with $_GET["sorting"], or add $sorting = $_GET['sorting']; to the top of your code.

Long answer: A long time ago, register_globals was used to automatically make URL parameters appear as variables. This lead to a lot of security problems (the above link contains an example), so it was eventually turned off by default (PHP 4.2.0). In PHP 6, this option no longer exists. Thus, you need to explicitly access URL GET parameters through $_GET or $_REQUEST.

As an alternative, you can explicitly import your URL parameters into local variables by using the import_request_variables command.

share|improve this answer

And to make it nicer, you can do this:

$sortBy = '';
switch($_GET["sorting"]{
  case 1:
    $sortBy = 'year';
    break;
  case 2:
    $sortBy = 'make';
    break;
  //...
}  

if(!empty($sortBy)) {
  $result = mysql_query('select * from vehicles ORDER BY ' . $sortBy . ' DSC');
}
else {
  $result = mysql_query('select * from vehicles');
}

This way, you only have to change your query at one point if you have to change it someday.

share|improve this answer

Is there some

$sorting = $_GET['sorting'];

somewhere in your code? It won't get it's value automatically.

share|improve this answer

Add this line at the start of your code.

$sorting = $_REQUEST['sorting'];
share|improve this answer

You need to get the $sorting variable from the $_GET array. I would also rewrite it as a switch statement like this:

switch($_GET['sorting'])
{
  case 1:
    $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY year DSC");
  brek;

  case 2:
    $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY make DSC");
  break;

  ...

  default:
    $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles");
  break;
}
share|improve this answer

Why not use switch:

switch ($sorting) {
    case 1:
        $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY year DSC");
        break;
    case 2:
        $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles ORDER BY make DSC");
        break;
    // ...
    default:
        $result = mysql_query("select * from vehicles");
        break;
}

Also, make sure $sorting is assigned:

$sorting = $_GET['sorting']; // Place somewhere before the switch
share|improve this answer

you can use $_GET['sorting'] or $_REQUEST['sorting'] if it could come in by either get or post, but why not do this?

$query = "SELECT * FROM `vehicles`";

$sort_values = array( 1 => 'year', 'make', 'miles', 'downpay', 'pricepay', 'pricecash' );
$sort_number = $_GET['sorting'];
if( $sort_number <= count($sort_values) ) {
    $query .= " ORDER BY `{$sort_values[ $sort_number ]}` DESC";
}

$result = mysql_query($query);

note that the 1 => portion of the array is because you 1-indexed your list of queries.
the reason for the <= portion of the if statement is for that reason too -- if you 0-indexed it, you would just use <.

It may not seem like it yet, but you'll quickly find out that it's worth it to try and find ways to write less code. Using the array means you don't have to copy / paste any code (repeatedly writing $result = mysql_query(...);, etc) and it is virtually effortless to add new columns to your table, should you ever need to display more information.

One might even fetch the column names from the database directly and avoid ever touching this code again.

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