Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of code, to throw an error during compilation using the #error directive, checking for the chip type present on the board. When I run it, I get an output that is something like below:

errorchk.c:9:2: error: #error "I can't run"

I was expecting to see an error like this:

errorchk.c:9: error: "I can't run"

I'm not able to figure out what is the error in line 9 (if any), that is shown below.

#include "stdio.h"
#define X 2
void main()
{
  int x=6;
    if(x>5)
    {
#if X>1
#error "I can't run"
#endif
    }
}

Could someone please clarify if the message on the stdout is as expected? essentially, is the "#error" supposed to be printed in the error-string?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

The C standard doesn't specify exactly what the compiler should output, only that the tokens after #error must be included in the output. The output you get is "conforming". Different compilers can do different things.

For instance, clang has a different format, but it is conforming too:

$ cat t.c
#error hello
$ clang -c t.c
t.c:1:2: error: hello
#error hello
 ^
1 error generated.

The error is printed as you want it, with extra context.

Reference: C11 draft, §6.10.5 Error directive

A preprocessing directive of the form

# error pp-tokensopt new-line

causes the implementation to produce a diagnostic message that includes the specified sequence of preprocessing tokens.

share|improve this answer

That's the expected output (to stderr, not stdout).

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I used the wrong term. I should have been a little more elaborate. I'm running a build for my project, where it checks for a peripheral chip. And the build is expected to break under certain conditions, and the error displayed on the terminal where the build was running. –  abhi Sep 14 '13 at 8:24

I would suggest that it is a useful part of the diagnostic to know that it is a message thrown by a #error directive rather than a built-in compiler message. Either way the actual format of compiler diagnostics of any kind is not mandated by the language standard.

share|improve this answer

"I'm not able to figure out what is the error in line 9"

Macros that use directives starting with # are run before the rest of the code is compiled, let alone executed.

The error is clear. X is defined to be 2 when the preprocessor reaches line 9, so the condition is true, and the #error directive fires, stopping compilation.

It may appear to some that the value of x is 6 at that point. But the C code is not being executed. It is not even compiled yet. The X and x have nothing to do with each other.

A more interesting example would use the same case, either X or x, in both places.

#include "stdio.h"
#define X 2
void main()
{
    int X=6;
    if(X>5)
{
#if X>1
#error "I can't run"
#endif
    }
}

In that case, they are still not the same thing. Instead, the preprocessor would replace every occurrence of the character X in the source with the character 2. Even if you removed the error directive, the code would not compile because the line int 2=6; is not valid C.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.