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I have a tree data structure in which parent node can have any number of child nodes(>=0). I want to create such tree. One of the possible approach thought by me is creating a linked list as shown in my_approach picture. Linked list are connected as shown.

U can suggest alternative approach also

enter image description here enter image description here

So I wrote a code to search in tree.(sorry for long code)To help u to understand my notations

class node
{   public:
    node* boss;
    string name;
    node* next;
    int level;
    node* next_level;
    node* search(string);
    node() : boss(NULL), next(NULL), next_level(NULL){ }
    friend class my_tree;

};

node* ans=NULL;
class my_tree
{
    public:
    my_tree();
    void print(node*);
    node* search(string,node*);
    node* gethead();
    bool is_empty();
    void add(string, node*);
    node* head;
};

my_tree::my_tree()
{
    head=new node;
    head->boss=NULL;
    head->name=""; 
    head->next=NULL;
    head->level=0;
    head->next_level=NULL;
}


bool my_tree::is_empty()
{
    if(head->next_level==NULL)
        {return 1;}
    else if(head->next_level!=NULL)
        {return 0;}
}

node* my_tree::gethead()
{   
    return head;
}

node* my_tree::search(string employee, node* ptr)
{   
    cout<<"ptr="<<ptr<<endl;
    if (ptr==NULL)
        {return NULL;}
    else if(ptr->name==employee)
        {cout<<"yup"<<endl;
        ans=ptr;
        return ptr;}
    else if(ptr->name!=employee)
        {
        search(employee, ptr->next_level);
        search(employee, ptr->next);
        cout<<"in search ans : "<<ans<<endl;
        return ans;
        }

}

void my_tree::add(string employee, node* immediate_boss)
{
    node* temp;
    temp=new node;
    temp->name=employee;
    if(immediate_boss->next_level==NULL)
        {
        temp->boss=immediate_boss;
        temp->level=immediate_boss->level+1;
        immediate_boss->next_level=temp;
        }
    else if(immediate_boss->next_level!=NULL)
        {node* ptr=immediate_boss->next_level;
        while(ptr->next!=NULL)
            {ptr=ptr->next;}
        temp->boss=immediate_boss;
        temp->level=immediate_boss->level+1;
        ptr->next=temp;
        }
    cout<<"employee added:"<<temp->name<<" at "<<temp<<endl;
}


main()
{
    my_tree Company;
    char a;
    string line1;
    string line2;
    a=myfile.get();
    bool e;
    cout<<"head : "<<Company.gethead()<<endl;
    while(myfile.good() and myfile.is_open())
        {

        //I do some operations and get line2 and line1
            //search functions searches for element( here I called employee) and gives its pointer. I use this pointer to add line1 as child node of line2. 
                Company.add(line2,Company.search(line2,Company.gethead()));
                line1.clear();
                line2.clear();
                ans=NULL;
                }


            }


}

This works for 1st node but search gives incorrect result after adding >1 nodes. NOTE : I am new at c++ and don't know concept of vectors. So I have to do this without using vectors. Also ,U can suggest suitable structure if possible.

share|improve this question
    
I used recursive approach in search. –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 12:02
    
U can suggest alternative structure also. But please give me some hint to solve this. –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 12:09
    
Basically this is hierarchical structure of company. –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 12:18
    
top down approach –  Navi Sep 14 '13 at 12:23
1  
In your solution in function search you are recursively calling search () but you are not checking the result of these calls... so when you have more nodes, then you will actually never get right answer because you did not catch it.... –  Dusan Plavak Sep 14 '13 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

You may consider storing next pointers in vector (or array) of pointers:

class Node{
public:
    string name() const {return _name;}
....


private:
    string _name;  //some data stored in node
    vector<Node *> next;  //vector of childs
};

Then in your search method you iterate over this vector:

Node *search (string name)
{
    if (_name == name)
        return this;
    else
        for(int ix = 0; ix < next.size(); ++ix)
        {
            Node *temp = next[ix]->search(name);
            if (temp->name() == name)
                return temp;
        }
    return 0; //nothing found
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know much about vectors. Can I do without vector? –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 12:23
1  
You can replace vector of pointers with array of pointers int *next[no_of_childs]; –  cpp Sep 14 '13 at 12:24
10  
@nikhil if you don't know about std::vector now is a wonderful time to learn. “I don't know x” should never be an excuse to not learn x. –  Nik Bougalis Sep 14 '13 at 12:27
    
@NikBougalis sure! –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 12:32

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