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Here is code to take input from text file. I used charecter wise reading. When I print B, it prints extra line after 'rao' only.

My text file input is :

1 singh
2 sen singh rao singh pal sen jain sen de rao 
3

Here is code

int main() {
  ifstream in;
  in.open( "Text.txt" );

  string s;
  while(getline(in,s)){
    char x;
    x=in.get();
    if(x=='1'){
      string s;
      in>>s;
    }

    if (x=='2'){
      char c;
      c=in.get();
      c=in.get();
      do{
        string A;
        string B;

        do{
          A=A+c;
          c=in.get();
        } while(c!=' ');

        c=in.get();

        do{
          B=B+c;
          c=in.get();
        } while(c!=' '&&c!='1'&&c!='2'&&c!='3'&&c!='4'&&c!='5'&&c!='6'&&c!='7');

        cout<<B<<endl;
      }

      while(c!='1'&&c!='2'&&c!='3'&&c!='4'&&c!='5'&&c!='6'&&c!='7');
      if(c!='1'||c=='2'||c=='3'||c=='4'||c=='5'||c=='6'||c=='7'){
        in.putback(c);
      }
    }
  }
}
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2  
You're concatenating endl after every row. Of course you will end up with a finishing new line –  Itay Sep 14 '13 at 14:34
    
so how to skip that? –  user2779366 Sep 14 '13 at 14:35
    
You can work with a regular while instead of do while and print the endl at the loop's beginning –  Itay Sep 14 '13 at 14:37
    
even if i do not use endl the output is :"singhsinghsensenrao" with a line break –  user2779366 Sep 14 '13 at 14:57
    
Suggestion, instead of comparing for all those !=, try something like: unsigned int value; in >> value; } while ((value > 0) && (value < 8)); –  Thomas Matthews Sep 14 '13 at 17:35
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2 Answers 2

std::endl inserts a newline character and flushes the stream. If you want to just flush use std::flush but to be honest most of the time you need neither.

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And what will you use instead? –  Itay Sep 14 '13 at 14:35
    
@italy most of the time you don't need to flush –  A. H. Sep 14 '13 at 14:35
1  
@Itay cout << '\n' generally works well. –  Alan Stokes Sep 14 '13 at 14:38
2  
@itay you generally don't want to interfere with how a stream is buffered. That being said there are special cases where you need/ would be safer with an explicit flush. –  A. H. Sep 14 '13 at 14:47
3  
@Itay stream << std::endl is equivalent to stream << '\n' << std::flush. That is, it's a combined command for "insert newline and flush the stream." –  Angew Sep 14 '13 at 14:54
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First of all you may want to revise your code as if you forget the empty space at the end of the line in the input file, you enter into an infinite cycle here:

do{
  A=A+c;
  c=in.get();
} while(c!=' ');

If the last char in the line is a ' ' it's fine: you exit from this cycle but with the c=in.get(); that follows you load the char newline into c.

The while cycle over the string B first of all loads c (which is a newline char) into the empty string B. Then you read the char 3 from the file and so you exit the cycle.

Now it's clear that the cout prints two new lines: one in B and the other one coming from endl.

Maybe it is clearer if you consider that you input file is like this:

1 singh[newline]2 sen singh rao singh pal sen jain sen de rao [newline]3

A fast solution comes putting this line right before the cout:

if (B=="\n") B.clear();

I'm not sure about the objective of the code so it's hard to me to propose a better design.

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check out for purpose (make sure to read comments as well) stackoverflow.com/questions/18801526/… –  Nikhil Sep 14 '13 at 17:55
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