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I'm working with sublime text 2 build 2221, on Windows 8; python 2.7.

I want to pass the name of the file I'm currently working on in st2 to a command by calling a key binding like this:

{ "keys": ["ctrl+shift+2"],"command": "run_me", "args":{"cmd":"$1"} }

where "$1" gets replaced with the name of the file in the current view, i.e. the file I'm looking at when hitting the keys. How would I go about this?

My script for run_me looks like this:

class runMeCommand(sublime_plugin.WindowCommand):
    def run(self, **kwargs):
        cmd_string = kwargs["cmd"]
        os.system("start "+cmd_string)

I found the following references here and here which seem to talk about this but I couldn't get it to work.

Relevant quotes from the links:

Link 1:
...
"args": {
      "contents": "console.log('=== HEARTBEAT $TM_FILENAME [$TM_LINE_NUMBER] ===');${0}"
...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Link 2:
$TM_FILENAME    Filename of the file being edited including extension.
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Also had a look at this question which seems quite similar –  pandita Sep 14 '13 at 14:58
    
Can you give some more information on what you are trying to do? Are you trying to write a snippet or a plugin to perform some other action with the file name? –  skuroda Sep 14 '13 at 16:41
    
@skuroda I added the run_me command. I would like to redirect the file name to the shell via an os.system or subprocess call. Thanks –  pandita Sep 14 '13 at 23:47
    
I also found a discussion here. There, it seems, "$file_basename" is used, which returns the string $filename rather than the actual file name when I send it to my string. Is it possible that I have to deal with this in my script? I.e. searching for strings like $file_name and replacing them with the actual file name using view.file_name()? –  pandita Sep 15 '13 at 0:07
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This seems to be the way to do it (HT @skuroda):

class runMeCommand(sublime_plugin.WindowCommand):
    def run(self, **kwargs):
        try:
            if "$file_name" in kwargs["cmd"]:
                cur_view = self.window.active_view()
                cmd_string=kwargs["cmd"].replace("$file_name",cur_view.file_name())
                os.system("start "+cmd_string)
            else:
                os.system("start "+cmd_string)
        except TypeError:
            sublime.message_dialog("Something went wrong with the command given... \n\n\n"+traceback.format_exc())

And the key binding looks like this:

{ "keys": ["alt+shift+3"],"command": "run_me", "args":{"cmd":"echo $file_name"} }

If the runMe class will always only get one argument only there is no need to use **kwargs:

def run(self, cmd):
    try:
        if "$file_name" in cmd:
            cur_view = self.window.active_view()
            cmd_string=cmd.replace("$file_name",cur_view.file_name())
            os.system("start "+cmd_string)
        else:
            cmd_string=cmd
            os.system("start "+cmd_string)
    except TypeError:
        sublime.message_dialog("Something went wrong with the command given... \n\n\n"+traceback.format_exc())

The key binding would be the same as above.

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1  
This is the proper way to do it. You can grab the absolute path using view#file_name, then substitute it as you would like. Some small things (that may not matter), you can use cmd as your arg so you don't have to look through the kargs map. Also note that view#file_name may return None if it doesn't exist on disk, so you may want to add a check for that also. Finally, you could also use a TextCommand to get access to the view (it would be self.view.file_name). If you want to use the window command still, you should use self.window` rather than sublime.Window. –  skuroda Sep 15 '13 at 16:08
    
@skuroda I updated my answer above. Thanks! –  pandita Sep 15 '13 at 21:40
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