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I have recently started studying backbone.js. I found it awesome; I think it is really useful and elegant to keep your code tidy and well structured.

After implementing the classic todo application, I tried to design a simple application. I thought that a calculator could be a good example.

The most problematic part is the view. I use a single view that listens to click events on a button and then updates the output element (the screen of the calculator). The model provides the elementary operation (such as addition and subtraction) and store only the result.

However, as soon as I started the implementation, a problem arise. The view is able to detect a click event, but it is NOT able to identify which button has been clicked.

First of wall, do you think my design is correct? How can I identify the correct button? ( the code is in the end of the post)

Would it be better to have two views, one which controls the buttonsand one for each button?For example, a button may listen to a click event on itself and then trigger another event with its number, which is then caught by the other view?

Any suggestion is truly appreciated. :D

Here is the code :

index.html :

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge,chrome=1">
    <title>Backbone.js • Calculator</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css/base.css">
</head>
<body>

<section id="calculatorApp">
    <header id="header">
        <h1>CalculatorJS</h1>
        <div id="output">Result</div>
    </header>
    <section id="buttons">
        <div class='button'>1</div>
        <div class='button'>2</div>
        <div class='button'>3</div>
        <div class='button'>4</div>
        <div class='button'>5</div>
        <div class='button'>6</div>
        <div class='button'>7</div>
        <div class='button'>8</div>
        <div class='button'>9</div>
    </section>
</section>

<script src="js/lib/jquery.js"></script>
<script src="js/lib/underscore.js"></script>
<script src="js/lib/backbone.js"></script>
<script src="js/lib/backbone.localStorage.js"></script>
<script src="js/views/calculator.js"></script>
<script src="js/model/calc.js"></script>
<script src="js/app.js"></script>

</body>
</html>

AppView.js

var app = app || {};

app.AppView = Backbone.View.extend({

    el: '#calculatorApp',
    events:{
        'click .button':'update_output'
    },
    initialize: function () {
        this.$output = this.$('#output');
        this.$buttons = this.$('#buttons');
        console.log("Initialize function AppView");

    },
    update_output:function(symbol){
        console.log("Update output : " +  symbol);
        console.log(symbol);
    },
    click:function () {
        console.log("click");
    }
    },
    // Class properties
    {
         NUMBERS:10
    }
);

====== EDIT =======

As suggested by Colin, using the even.target I could retrieve the button that has been clicked.

However, I am more concern about the design of the application, so I decided to break down the view into two decoupled views. The AppView which is the external view, and the ButtonView which is the view associated with buttons. This design arise the need for a means of notifying the external view when a button is clicked. I thought the best solution should be to use a dedicate event "clickOn". When a user clicks on a button, the onClick event is triggered by the ButtonView. The AppView listens to this event and updates the output when it is received. To achieve this result, I had to introduce an additional object (vent) in the application namespace, so that both AppView and ButtonView can use the same events.

Is this a better design as I can exchange the views without any side effects?

Here is the changes I have introduced :

var app = app || {};

app.ButtonView = Backbone.View.extend({

    tagName: 'div',
    className : 'button',

    events:{
        'click' : 'onClick'
    },

    template: _.template($('#button-template').html()),

    initialize:function() {
        console.log("Initialize button : " + this.model.symbol);
    },

    render: function () {
        console.log("Render function");
        this.$el.html(this.template( {"symbol" : this.model.symbol}));
        return this;
    },

    onClick: function () {
        console.log("Hi, I am " + this.model.symbol);
        app.vent.trigger("clickOn", this.model.symbol);
    }
});

Events :

app.vent = _.extend({}, Backbone.Events);

AppView.js :

app.AppView = Backbone.View.extend({

    el: '#calculatorApp',
    events:{
    },
    initialize: function () {
        this.$output = this.$('#output');
        this.$buttons = this.$('#buttons');
        console.log("Initialize function AppView");
        this.createNumericButtons();
       ttonView({model:new_model});
        this.$buttons.append(b this.listenTo(app.vent, 'clickOn', this.update_output)
    },

        createNumericButtons:function(){
            for (var i=0; i< app.AppView.NUMBERS; i++){
                var new_model = {symbol:i};
                var button = new app.Buutton.render().el);
        }
    },

    update_output:function(symbol){
        console.log("Update output : " + symbol);
        this.$output.html(symbol);
    },
    click:function () {
        console.log("click");
    }
    },
    // Class properties
    {
         NUMBERS:10
    }
);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can access the clicked element by using event.target, like this:

update_output:function(event){
    // event.target refers to the clicked element
    console.log(event.target);
}

A simplified demo via JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/C7PZZ/1/

Regarding your overall design, your application is probably trivial enough that a single view is fine. However, I'd recommend creating a separate ButtonView. Breaking the UI down into smaller pieces, i.e. views, helps keep things manageable as applications grow in complexity. If you're interested in building Backbone applications, I think that it would be a good exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Sometimes you want event.currentTarget. –  mu is too short Sep 14 '13 at 17:02
    
Hi, thanks for your answer! event.target worked correctly. However, following you advice, I have broken down the view into two smaller ones. My post has been updated with the new design. –  Giuseppe Pes Sep 14 '13 at 17:26

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