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I'am developing something which should work like a hosting panel for a self deploying application. I created a method which has file name and arguments as parameters and should give the output on the panel web page when executed.

Here is my method;

private string ExecuteCmd(string sysUser, SecureString secureString, string argument, string fileName)
    {
        using (Process p = new Process())
        {
            p.StartInfo.FileName = fileName;
            p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;

            p.StartInfo.UserName = sysUser;
            p.StartInfo.Password = secureString;

            p.StartInfo.Arguments = argument;
            p.Start();
            p.WaitForExit();

            StreamReader sr = p.StandardOutput;

            p.Close();

            string message = sr.ReadToEnd();

            return message;
        }
    }

When I use this method to create sites on IIS (with appcmd.exe) I get all the output as I execute this executable on command promt. But when it comes to dnscmd.exe to create entries on DNS, I get nothing! StandardOutput just comes out empty. I use administrator credentials to execute these executables. By the way, I am on Windows Server 2012 Standart. I didn't test this method on Server 2008 R2 yet, but I believe the result would be the same, anyway.

It's kind of strange for me to see appcmd and dnscmd executables behave differently on the same method.

What is it I am missing here?

Thanks!

Edit: Both StandardOutput and StandardError are returning error for dnscmd.exe.

Edit2: I changed ReadLine() to ReadToEnd(). That was something I changed when I was playing around, trying things. The original code had ReadToEnd().

Edit3: Full methods with filepath and arguments. That is for IIS, which shows output with no problems;

private string ExecuteAppCmd(string sysUser, SecureString secureString)
    {
        using (Process p = new Process())
        {
            p.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv\APPCMD.EXE";
            p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            p.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;

            p.StartInfo.UserName = sysUser;
            p.StartInfo.Password = secureString;

            p.StartInfo.Arguments = " list site domain.com";
            p.Start();
            p.WaitForExit();

            StreamReader sr = p.StandardOutput;

            p.Close();

            string message = sr.ReadToEnd().Replace("\n", "<br />");

            return message;
        }
    }

"appcmd list site domain.com" shows the iis site configuration for domain.com on the command promt. If the domain.com is not in iis, it shows an error. Either way, there is an output and it works fine with this code.

And this is for dnscmd. This one does the job on asp.net page, but does not show it's output with StandardOutput. However, the output is shown on command prompt.

private string ExecuteDnsCmd(string sysUser, SecureString secureString)
    {
        using (Process p = new Process())
        {
            p.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Windows\System32\DNSCMD.EXE";
            p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            p.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;

            p.StartInfo.UserName = sysUser;
            p.StartInfo.Password = secureString;

            p.StartInfo.Arguments = " /zoneadd domain.com /primary";
            p.Start();
            p.WaitForExit();

            StreamReader sr = p.StandardError;

            p.Close();

            string message = sr.ReadToEnd().Replace("\n", "<br />");

            return message;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Maybe dnscmd only writes to StandardError. To investigate have a look a this answer –  rene Sep 14 '13 at 19:02
    
As a matter of fact, I tried both StandardError and StandardOutput. I should have wrote that as a comment really. But both of them returns empty. Thanks for the quick response, by the way :) –  ilter Sep 14 '13 at 19:51
    
if you try on the commandprompt dnscmd > output.txt gets output.txt filled? –  rene Sep 14 '13 at 19:56
    
Just checking: the taget server has the DNS Service installed? –  rene Sep 14 '13 at 20:01
    
As you are only reading the first line, is the firstline of dnscmd maybe empty? –  rene Sep 14 '13 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't have a box where I can run dnscmd.exe but because you claim everything else works, I can only imagine the handling of the error and output streams get somehow tangled up. If you try this code, the only diference is that this code handles both error and output streams on separate threads and collect their output during the run. If this works, your code should be fine as well.

        // as there will not be an input stream so don't Redirect 
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = false;

        // use a stringbuilder to capture everything
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        // raise events on stdout and stderr and handle them
        p.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        p.OutputDataReceived += (sender, args) => sb.AppendFormat("Out: {0}<br />",args.Data);
        p.ErrorDataReceived  += (sender, args) => sb.AppendFormat("Err: {0}<br />",args.Data);

        p.Start();

        // start consuming
        p.BeginOutputReadLine();
        p.BeginErrorReadLine();

        // wait for process to exit
        p.WaitForExit();

        p.Close();

        // obtain out stringbuilder value
        string message = sb.ToString();

        return message;
share|improve this answer
    
I feel so terrible. I played with this code so long that I forgot that I had a control check in the main method :( Both your code, and mine are working fine after removing that check. I realized my mistake when I tried your code. So, I 'am choosing this one as the answer. But I think it should be better if you also told that your code and my code are the different ways of doing the same thing, except mine is giving the output which is created at the end of the process, and yours is capturing all the outputs during the process. I hope that I am not mistaken. –  ilter Sep 16 '13 at 6:41
    
That is corrct! I 'll reflect that in my answer. Don't feel to embaressed. Sometimes the obvious bugs are so hard to spot you need someone else to figure out what is going on. I'm glad it worked for you in the end. –  rene Sep 16 '13 at 7:55

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