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I am trying to pick up some Common Lisp. I'm accustomed to curly-brackets imperative languages, and am still having trouble wrapping my head around Lisp-style thinking and syntax.

Below is a permutations function I'm trying to write. It is currently broken.

If I run this function with

(permutations '(1 2 3))

I can see at the breakpoint labeled "and here" that lists such as (2 3), (3 2), (1 3) are being generated at that point. But then by running a trace in SLIME I see that the the permutation function is returning (2), (3), and (1) after that call (first item in the lisp). The top level function then just returns nil (which I also don't understand).

(defun permutations (coll)
(if (= 1 (length coll))
 (print (list (first coll)))
  (loop for el in coll do
   (map 'list #'(lambda (combos) 
          (if 
               (break "you got here with arguments ~:S." (listp combos))
               (cons el combos)
               (break "and here: ~:S " (list el combos))))

    (permutations (remove el coll))
    ))))

What am I doing wrong here? Thanks in advance for any help.

EDIT: Here is what I have after changing the function in response to jlahd's comments. This returns (((1 ((2 3))) (1 ((3 2)))) ((2 ((1 3))) (2 ((3 1)))) ((3 ((1 2))) (3 ((2 1))))) when called with the original example. Haven't figured out how to fix the nested list thing yet.

(defun permutations (coll)
  (if (= 1 (length coll))
      (print (list (first coll)))
      (loop for el in coll collect
           (map 'list #'(lambda (combos) 
                          (list el combos))    
                (permutations (remove el coll))
                ))))

EDIT: Ok, thanks everyone for the help here! Here is what I have after Rörd and wxvxw's comments. This runs and returns ((1 2 . 3) (1 3 . 2) (2 1 . 3) (2 3 . 1) (3 1 . 2) (3 2 . 1)). I'm not exactly sure what the "dotted pair" notation here means as compared to a plain list, but otherwise this seems good.

(defun permutations (coll)
  (if (not (cdr coll))
      (list (first coll))
      (loop for el in coll nconc
           (mapcar #'(lambda (combos) 
                       (cons el combos))    
                   (permutations (remove el coll))
                   ))))
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1  
Use an editor to indent your code correctly. That improves readability a lot. –  Rainer Joswig Sep 14 '13 at 21:03
    
Use the loop keyword nconc instead of collect to append the lists generated by the map into a single list. –  Rörd Sep 14 '13 at 21:17
    
Also, use cons instead of list to add a single element to the beginning of a list. –  Rörd Sep 14 '13 at 21:18
    
Also, (map 'list ...) is equivalent to (mapcar ...). (= 1 (length some-list)) is an inherently bad idea, because it's invariant (not (cdr some-list)) will at all times be faster or the same speed. Also, package alexandria has a function to compute permutations. You may want to take a look at how it's done there. –  user797257 Sep 14 '13 at 21:31
    
Thanks for your suggestions. –  vancan1ty Sep 14 '13 at 21:55

1 Answer 1

You are discarding all data you gather in the loop. Change do to collect and you are much further.

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Okay, thanks. If I do that the function returns ((NIL NIL) (NIL NIL) (NIL NIL)), which is progress. –  vancan1ty Sep 14 '13 at 20:18
1  
Oh yes. You are also not handling the latter break correctly but discarding results there. Just get rid of the if along with the breaks. –  jlahd Sep 14 '13 at 20:22
    
Ah my bad -- for some reason I thought that the break functions returned their arguments. Really stupid. With that stuff removed the function returns (((1 ((2 3))) (1 ((3 2)))) ((2 ((1 3))) (2 ((3 1)))) ((3 ((1 2))) (3 ((2 1))))) . I need some way to give it a choice between consing on to an old list and creating a new so I don't get these nested lists. I was trying to do this with the if statement, but the conditional argument to the if statement was always nil apparently. –  vancan1ty Sep 14 '13 at 20:55

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