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In a problem, I initialize a tree from the elements of an integer file (note that the tree does not necessarily have to be balanced).

Then I have to print the same tree in ascending order, ie, from lowest to highest. The problem with this is the following:

The elements of the file are: 1 - 5 - 90 - 0 - 50 - 70

So, the expected print is: 0 - 1 - 5 - 50 - 70 - 90 (from lower to higher), but the console shows: 5 - 0 - 50 - 1 - 70 - 90

program loadTree;

type
      IntegerFile = file of Integer
    ; pointer = ^treeP
    ; treeP = record
          value : Integer
        ; low   : pointer
        ; big   : pointer
      end
    ;


procedure loadTree ( var tree: pointer; var file: integerFile; p : Integer );
  var value
        :Integer
    ;

  begin
    if ( tree = NIL ) then 
      begin
        read ( file, value );
        new ( tree );
        tree^.value := value;
        tree^.low := NIL;
        tree^.big := NIL;
      end;

    if ( p < ( filesize ( file ) - 1 ) ) then
      begin
        read ( file, value );
        seek ( file, ( p + 1 ) );
        if ( value < tree^.value ) then
          loadTree ( tree^.low, file, ( p + 1 ) )
        else
          loadTree ( tree^.big, file, ( p + 1 ) );
      end;
  end;

procedure printTree ( tree: pointer );
  begin
    if ( tree <> nil ) then
      begin
        printTree ( tree^.low );
        writeln ( arbol^.value );
        printTree ( tree^.big );
      end;
  end;

(...)

Begin

(...)

cargarArbol ( tree, file, 0 );
imprimirArbol ( tree );

(...)
end.

Assume that I already declared the variables and initialize the file

The question is: what I can do to fix it?

I can't find the error and I would like to know if the problem is in the load of the tree or when I try to print it.

share|improve this question
    
If we can't see the variables and the contents you initialize them to from the file, your question is very vague. How are we supposed to reproduce the problem you're having if you don't give us the specific details? Please edit to provide a SSCCE. –  Ken White Sep 14 '13 at 21:16
    
No matter how I initialize the variables or the file. Why do you want to know how I opened it? all you have to know is that I opened the file without errors and has only integer data. Thanks –  Tomi Sebastián Juárez Sep 14 '13 at 21:21
    
It does in fact matter, or I wouldn't have asked for that information. If I copy and paste your code into an editor, I can't run it to reproduce your problem, because there is no code or data there that initializes the variables, and no file to use to load it from either. Your posted code also uses two methods (cargarArbol and imprimirArbol, that I presume mean loadTree and printTree, but I certainly can't compile it as you've posted. –  Ken White Sep 14 '13 at 21:38

2 Answers 2

I did not run your code but from what I see , the problem lies here :

    if ( value < tree^.value ) then
      loadTree ( tree^.low, file, ( p + 1 ) )
    else
      loadTree ( tree^.big, file, ( p + 1 ) );
  end;

let us take a very simple sequence : 50 - 70 - 30 So let us construct the tree according to your algorithm: I make initial node : 50

Then , I check 70 > 50 , so I pass my right node as tree send p+1 where val(p+1) = 70 (this needs to be inserted). So, now my tree is . 50 as root , having 70 on right node. But current node is pointing at 70. Now when you compare the next element, which is 30 , you check that it is less than 70 and you insert it to the left of 70. In fact, at that point , it should have been inserted to left of node having value 50. The structure you are making is not a tree, it is kind of zigzag having height of n always.

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I cannot explain the order in which the numbers are printed. But from how I read your code, you keep on building the tree below the next number found in the file. So, every number will have only one branch filled in (low or big). However, if the current number is larger than the previous number and the next number is less than the current number, then the next number may also be smaller than the previous number. If you still follow me, and if I am correct, then you should always enter a new number from the top of the tree then follow the tree down at every node (is it bigger or is it lower?) until the right place of the number is found (no bigger or lower) and fill it in (big or low).

After googling a bit: http://mypascalbook.blogspot.com/2009/11/14-pointer-basics-binary-tree-lists-in.html

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