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I've been working at trying to figure out how to get query planning to act a little smarter for a while now pretty unsuccessfully. I've messed around with work_mem and friends, run vacumm analyze plenty and tried altering the query with order by. I've included 3 runs of the same query with different offsets. I'm under the impression that this query is not nearly as performant as it could be. Any thoughts?

Just in case it doesn't jump out at you -- the only changes between the following queries is the offset

bloomapi=# explain analyze SELECT * FROM npis WHERE provider_last_name_legal_name = 'THOMPSON' offset 250 limit 10;
                                                                             QUERY PLAN
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=965.13..998.97 rows=10 width=2589) (actual time=568.458..577.507 rows=10 loops=1)
   ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on npis  (cost=119.15..20382.11 rows=5988 width=2589) (actual time=58.140..577.027 rows=260 loops=1)
         Recheck Cond: ((provider_last_name_legal_name)::text = 'THOMPSON'::text)
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on npis_temp_provider_last_name_legal_name_idx1  (cost=0.00..117.65 rows=5988 width=0) (actual time=36.819..36.819 rows=5423 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((provider_last_name_legal_name)::text = 'THOMPSON'::text)
 Total runtime: 578.301 ms
(6 rows)

bloomapi=# explain analyze SELECT * FROM npis WHERE provider_last_name_legal_name = 'THOMPSON' offset 100 limit 10;
                                                                             QUERY PLAN
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=395.81..435.40 rows=10 width=2589) (actual time=0.397..0.440 rows=10 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using npis_temp_provider_last_name_legal_name_idx1 on npis  (cost=0.00..23701.38 rows=5988 width=2589) (actual time=0.063..0.293 rows=110 loops=1)
         Index Cond: ((provider_last_name_legal_name)::text = 'THOMPSON'::text)
 Total runtime: 0.952 ms
(4 rows)

bloomapi=# explain analyze SELECT * FROM npis WHERE provider_last_name_legal_name = 'THOMPSON' offset 4100 limit 10;
                                                                            QUERY PLAN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=13993.25..14027.09 rows=10 width=2589) (actual time=9356.723..9400.021 rows=10 loops=1)
   ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on npis  (cost=119.15..20382.11 rows=5988 width=2589) (actual time=2.968..9393.327 rows=4110 loops=1)
         Recheck Cond: ((provider_last_name_legal_name)::text = 'THOMPSON'::text)
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on npis_temp_provider_last_name_legal_name_idx1  (cost=0.00..117.65 rows=5988 width=0) (actual time=1.943..1.943 rows=5423 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((provider_last_name_legal_name)::text = 'THOMPSON'::text)
 Total runtime: 9400.426 ms
(6 rows)

Some relevant notes:

  • I cleared the shared memory on the system before running the first query so some of the actual time of the first query is probably impacted by index loading
  • the data is wide and sparse -- 329 columns, many of which are empty character varying(30ish)
  • the data is virtually read-only -- being updated with another 15k rows once a week.
  • the perf of these queries was actually higher for the same queries when there was the default db settings shipped with the ubuntu ppa (I don't have these query plans at the moment but could dig into them if it nothing obvious jumps out otherwise). The parameters that have been changed from the defaults: shared_buffers = 256MB, effective_cache_size = 512MB, checkpoint_segments = 64, checkpoint_completion_target = 0.9, default_statistics_target = 500
  • actual data about 4 million rows/ 1.29GB for the table by itself, provider_last_name_legal_name is btree indexed -- size of index is 95mb. about 3/4 of rows have a non-null value in this column, and whole table has 488k distinct values
share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried setting random_page_cost to a lower value (~ 1.5) ? BTW: what is your setting for work_mem Plus: effective_cache_size = 512M seems to be rather low; your 1.3GB table should (almost) fit in core, at least the index. –  wildplasser Sep 15 '13 at 0:04
    
BTW: I frown upon the LIMIT/OFFSET without an ORDER BY. On a text column which appears to be indexed, too. What is the cardinality of provider_last_name_legal_name ? Finally: 1.2G size/4Mrows := 300 bytes byte/row, which seems a bit high. BTW: how do you fit 329 columns into 300 bytes? –  wildplasser Sep 15 '13 at 10:31
    
@wildplasser setting a random_page_cost lower does make the planner estimate index scan is faster for higher offsets but the planner still switches over around offset of 700 with random_page_cost = 1.5. This said, even the index scan perf suffers at a large offset it seems. To answer the fitting 329 columns into 300 bytes -- most of the columns are null/ the table is very sparse. –  Michael Wasser Sep 15 '13 at 18:58
    
@wildplasser Also, the cardinality isn't super high/ low -- 488k distinct values over 3M of the 4M rows (the last 1M rows are empty). It's a table of people with last names in the US -- so it probably has a frequency distribution similar to names.mongabay.com/most_common_surnames.htm –  Michael Wasser Sep 15 '13 at 19:08
    
I know the power-law distribution. But the bad news is that given 300+ columns you might have a data modelling problem. (personally, I can't even imagine 300+ colomns being totally independent/orthogonal. This kind of thing can happen in higher math. not even in physics) –  wildplasser Sep 15 '13 at 22:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My educated guess is that the large offsets are triggering these plans. Even though you are limiting results to ten rows, PostgreSQL has to consider all the preceding rows. I suspect that when you remove the offset (e.g. use limit 260 in the first query), you will see similar runtimes.

You can disable certain plan types using configuration parameters until the queries share similar plans. This may help you see why one plan is better than another.

set enable_bitmapscan = false;
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1  
Thanks! While this didn't solve my perf problem, it did answer my question/ help me debug and figure out that the query plans being used weren't all that dumb. Index Scans with high offsets were also slow. There was a much higher offset where the switch over actually was correct -- but offsets seem to just be low perf ops in general (see response from Tom Lane-2 on postgresql.1045698.n5.nabble.com/…). I may need to find a more creative way to query or just be ok with low perf on this type of query. –  Michael Wasser Sep 15 '13 at 19:03

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