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So what do you think the negation of this logic proposition is:

All cars are not red

I think the negation of this is: All cars are red.

There is a car that does not fit a description of a coupe. 

I think the negation for this statement is: There is a car that does fit a description of a coupe.

Am I correct on these propositional logic

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closed as off-topic by BoltClock Sep 15 '13 at 11:04

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about programming. –  BoltClock Sep 15 '13 at 11:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
All cars are not red.

The strictly logical interpretation of this statement is "all cars are of colors other than red" or equivalently "no red car exists", the negation of which would be "there exists a red car". On the other hand, the traditional English interpretation of statements of this form (e.g. "all that glitters is not gold", "all who drink are not poets") would be "there exists a car that is not red"; the negation of that is "all cars are red".

There is a car that does not fit a description of a coupe.

The negation of this is "there is no car that does not fit the description of a coupe", or equivalently "every car is a coupe". That is not equivalent to "there is a car that does fit a description of a coupe" (i.e. "a coupe exists"), because it does not assert that a coupe (or any car) exists.

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What was the reason for the downvote? –  Beta Sep 16 '13 at 2:55

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