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The code below checks to ensure the command-line arguments are integers? However, I need it to only print each integer in the command line once, regardless of how many times that integer appears in the command line. How do I do that?

public class Unique {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i<args.length; i++) {
            try {
                int j = Integer.parseInt(args[i]);
                System.out.println(j);
            }
            catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                System.out.println("Your command line argument "+ args[i] +" is a non-integer!");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Add all integers to a hashset and print the set. –  Jeroen Vannevel Sep 15 '13 at 0:25
    
@JeroenVannevel, I'm not allowed to use any classes that serve as data structures such as ArrayList, etc. –  stburnish Sep 15 '13 at 0:27
    
sort your args array (Arrays.Sort()), loop over it and print the value only if the previous value is different from the current one. –  Jeroen Vannevel Sep 15 '13 at 0:29
    
@JeroenVannevel, Arrays.Sort is part of Array.List. I'm not allowed to use those. –  stburnish Sep 15 '13 at 0:44
    
No it's not, it's part of the class Arrays which is neither an array, nor an arraylist, nor any other datastructure. It provides you with utility methods on datastructures but it's not one by itself. All you do is manipulate the starting datastructure you already have (args[]). –  Jeroen Vannevel Sep 15 '13 at 0:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
public class UniqueNumbers {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    args = new String[6];
    args[0] = "5";
    args[1] = "6";
    args[2] = "2";
    args[3] = "5";
    args[4] = "1";
    args[5] = "1";

    Arrays.sort(args); 
   // Sort the array. This will use natural order:
   // low -> high for integers, a -> z and low to high for strings
   // Essentially this causes our array to sort from low to high, despite not being integers

    for (int i = 0; i < args.length; i++) { // Loop over the entire array
        if (i == 0) { // (1)
            System.out.println(args[0]);
        } else if (!(args[i - 1].equals(args[i]))) { // (2)
            System.out.println(args[i]);
        }
    }
  }
}

Output:

1
2
5
6

Clarification:

To make it easy to demonstrate, I've manually placed the values into the array. This makes no difference, you can just keep using your input method.

(1): Read (2) first. Because of the method below, we would essentially skip the first element. The second part of the else if essentially means if i > 0. If we wouldn't do this, we would get an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException when we do args[i - 1] because that would try to access args[-1]. That's why we skip the first element: to avoid this. However, this would also mean that our first value (1) would be ignored. That's why we just want to make sure the first value is always printed.

(2): Now we check if the current element (args[i]) is equal (.equals()) to the previous elements (args[i -1]). If this is not the case (! inverts a statement), we print the current value.

With this method, you can solve your assignment without any datastructures apart from the the standard one.

More visualization:

Start:

5 6 2 5 1 1

Sort:

1 1 2 5 5 6

Loop:

!  
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Output: 1

  !
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Not different from previous one, no output

    !
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Different from previous one, output: 1 2

      !
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Different from previous one, output 1 2 5

        !
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Not different from previous one, no output

          !
1 1 2 5 5 6 -> Different from previous one, output 1 2 5 6
share|improve this answer
    
This is great. Thanks! What if I had to do this without sorting? :) –  stburnish Sep 15 '13 at 1:22
    
@stburnish: Create a function that loops trough your array, gets the min value, stores it in a temp variable and prints it out. Then remove it from the array and do the same again. If the new minimum is the same as the temp variable, don't print it. Do this untill your array is empty. I'm not going to write this out though; the above solution entirely fits your requirements. You cannot solve this without using at least the args array. –  Jeroen Vannevel Sep 15 '13 at 1:27

What you need is a Set. A set does not contain duplicates, as it is defined mathematically. Java has a Set class that does that job.

Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
for (int i = 0; i < args.length; i++)
{
    try
    {
        int j = Integer.parseInt(args[i]);
        set.add(j);
    }
    catch (NumberFormatException e)
    {
        System.out.println("Your command line argument "+ args[i] +" is a non-integer!");
    }
}
System.out.println(set);

Or iterate over all the elements like this:

for (Integer i : set)
{
    System.out.println(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm a beginner. This is hard for me to follow. –  stburnish Sep 15 '13 at 0:43
public class Unique {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    final Set<Integer> uniqueIntegers = new HashSet<>();        

    for (int i = 0; i<args.length; i++) {
        try {
            int j = Integer.parseInt(args[i]);
            uniqueIntegers.add(j);
        }
        catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            System.out.println("Your command line argument "+ args[i] +" is a non-integer!");
        }
    }

    System.out.println(uniqueIntegers);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm very new to Java. Doesn't the code above involve classes that can serve as data structures? Those are not allowed in this case. –  stburnish Sep 15 '13 at 0:36
    
@stburnish yes, unfortunately it does... –  grape_mao Sep 15 '13 at 0:44

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