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void binarysearch(string key, vector<string>& f2){
sort_vector(f2);

int mid = 0;
int left = 0;
int right = f2.size();
bool found = false;
while (left < right){
    mid = left + (left+right)/2;
    if (key > f2[mid]){ 
        left = mid + 1;
    }
    else if(key < f2[mid]){
        right = mid;
    }
    else{
        found = true;
        left = right;
    }
}
cout << "out of while loop" << endl;
if (found == true){
    cout << "YES: " << key << endl;
}
else{
    cout << " NO: " << key << endl;
}
found = false;
}

When I run this, it terminates automatically and says "segmentation fault" with no line number given. What does that even mean and why am I getting this fault?

Thanks in advance

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1  
std::binary_search is already available –  P0W Sep 15 '13 at 6:58
1  
You should learn how to use the debugger. So enable debugging info and all warnings by compiling with g++ -Wall -g and use the gdb debugger.... (at least on Linux) –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 15 '13 at 7:01
    
Please provide the input it's crashing on. –  Nikhil Sep 15 '13 at 7:01
1  
you are possibly going out of bound, because of the way you have calculated mid. mid=(left+right)/2 and NOT mid=Left +(left+right)/2 –  mawia Sep 15 '13 at 7:02

1 Answer 1

A segmentation fault means the program accessed an invalid memory address. I suspect in this case it's the fact that this:

mid = left + (left+right)/2;

Leads to a value of mid that's greater than right at some point (since it's effectively the same as mid = 1.5 * left + 0.5 * right). It should be this:

mid = left + ( right - left ) / 2;

Or, better yet (as long as the sum of left + right does not exceed MAXINT), as mawia suggests:

mid = ( left + right ) / 2;
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