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I have given XML that I can't change and I need to deserialize it to a custom class:

<Person>
   <Addresses>
       <MainAddress>
          <Country />
          <City />
       </MainAddress>
       <AdditionalAddress>
          <Country />
          <City />
       </AdditionalAddress>
       <AdditionalAddress>
          <Country />
          <City />
       </AdditionalAddress>
       ... other additional addresses
   </Addresses>
   ... other elements
</Person>

Then I deserialize:

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Person), namespace);
Person person = serializer.Deserialize(stream) as Person;

Deserializer works fine in case simple elements are deserialized. When there is element like Addresses I implement IXmlSerializable on its class like here: link text

The problem is that reader.ReadElementContentAsString() cannot be used with complex elements.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Adressess class should be declared this way:

[XmlRoot("Adressess")]
public class Adressess
{
    [XmlElement(ElementName = "MainAddress")]
    public MainAddress Main { get; set; }

    [XmlElement(ElementName = "AdditionalAddress")]
    public List<AdditionalAddress> AdditionalAddresses { get; set; }
}

[XmlRoot("MainAddress")]
public class MainAddress 
{
    public string Country { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

[XmlRoot("AdditionalAddress")]
public class AdditionalAddress
{
    public string Country { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that the type-name isn't relevant, so e.g. the MainAddress property could be implemented in a class MainAddressStore or whatever (I find it's sometimes confusing to have properties and types share names). This isn't very important for skeleton classes like this whose only purpose is serialization support, of course. – Eamon Nerbonne Dec 10 '09 at 13:40
    
I've just edited the property names to be different that the class names. I'm just not sure if the distinct MainAddress and AdditionalAddress classes are really required. I wanted them to be annonated with different XmlRoot name. – PanJanek Dec 10 '09 at 13:49
    
I does not work. MainAddress is populated but AdditionalAddresses are not. – jlp Dec 10 '09 at 13:51
1  
Have you use XmlElement no annotate properties in Addresses class? I corrected it a moment ago. – PanJanek Dec 10 '09 at 13:59
    
This is a rather bad approach. One common Address class would be enough, no need to have separate classes for main and additional addresses. I've just seen someone deriving from this example and being needlesly confused. – famousgarkin Jun 25 '14 at 17:35

Also if the root object type has a namespace, you must use the same namespace for the nested types.

Example:

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute(Namespace = "some namespace")]
class Person {...}

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute(Namespace = "some namespace")]
class MainAddress{...}
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