Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to size a div's height to its container height, using CSS ?

<div class='container'><br>
  &nbsp;&nbsp;<div style='display: block; height: 500px'>left</div><br>
  &nbsp;&nbsp;<div id='to-be-sized' >right</div><br>
</div>
share|improve this question
2  
don't know that this is possible, but interested in any answers –  Jon Dec 10 '09 at 13:44

10 Answers 10

Could you not set the height of the contained element to be height:100%;

share|improve this answer
2  
No, since the container has height: auto so height: 100% would fallback to auto. –  Quentin Dec 10 '09 at 13:49
    
I take it height:auto is the default for a container which has no explicit height set? –  AJM Dec 10 '09 at 14:21
1  
Yes (is is the default and stackoverflow doesn't like three character comments) –  Quentin Dec 10 '09 at 15:59
    
Ok thanks (or 9 character ones) –  AJM Dec 10 '09 at 16:05

If my understanding is correct and the default height of a div where no height is specified is auto then this is not possible without setting an explicit height on the containing div. If an explicit height is set on the containing div then height:100% on the contained div will mean that it grows to the height of the container.

share|improve this answer

It seems like you are trying to get equal height columns. You could use the fauxcolumns method where a background image is used to fake the equal height. There are other methods out there.

share|improve this answer

It's a tricky thing to do--there's no clear-cut best approach, but there are a few common ones. If we assume that what you REALLY need is for the height of the right column to be (or appear to be) equivalent to the height of the left column, you can use any of the techniques frequently used to get equal height columns. This piece contains a few tricks to get the right look and behavior. I recommend reading it to see if it solves your problem.

The other approach uses Javascript to determine the height of the container, and setting your right-hand column to that. That technique has been discussed on SO here. As long as your container's size is not the only thing determining the size of your outer container, that should be a valid approach (if that's not the case, you'll have a chicken-egg problem that could cause weird behavior).

share|improve this answer
    
alistapart.com/articles/fauxcolumns <= Original article describing the Faux Columns technique you link to - which is what the top post really asks for ;) –  Arve Systad Dec 18 '09 at 22:24

Sample code, you need to start from the html element so you can make use of the flexible height in the containers.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
 <title>100% Test</title>
 <style type="text/css">

   html, body, #inner { height: 100% }
   #inner { border: 4px blue solid } 
   #container { height: 200px; border: 4px red solid }

 </style>
</head>
<body>

    <div id="container">
    	<div id="inner">
    		lorem ipsum
    	</div>
    </div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

You can tell the container div to display as table and have the inner div to display as a table cell.

The HTML

<body>
<div id="wrap">
    <div id="header">
        <h1>
            My Header</h1>
    </div>
    <div id="main">
        <ul id="nav">
            <li><a href="#">1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">2</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">3</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">4</a></li>
        </ul>
        <div id="primaryContent">

        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="footer">
        <h1>
            My Footer</h1>
    </div>
</div>

The CSS

#wrap
{
    width: 800px;
    margin: auto;
}

#header
{
    background: red;
}

#main
{
    display: table;
}

#nav
{
    background: gray;
    width: 150px;
    display: table-cell;
}

#primaryContent
{
    background: yellow;
    padding: 0 .5em;
    display: table-cell;
}

Fixes for IE

    #wrap 
{
    width: 800px;
    margin: auto;
}

#header, #footer
{
    background: red;
}

#main 
{
    background: url(../bg.png) repeat-y;
}

#nav 
{
    background: gray;
    width: 150px;
    float: left;
}

#primaryContent 
{
    background: yellow;
    margin-left: 150px;
    padding: 0 .5em;
}
share|improve this answer

There's a way to do this IF you happen to be using jQuery. As you asked for CSS this might not be an option available to you, but if you can utilise it it will do exactly what you want.

$(divToResize).css('height',$(container).innerHeight());

$(divToResize) is the selector for the DIV you wish to match the height of it's container and $(container) is logically the container whose height you want to get.

This will work regardless of if the container's height is specified in CSS or not.

share|improve this answer
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" 
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<style type="text/css">
.container{
    position:relative;
    background-color:#999;
}
#to-be-sized{
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    height:100%;
    background-color:#ddd;
}
</style>
<body>

<div class='container'>
    <br>
    &nbsp;&nbsp;
    <div style='display: block; height: 500px'>left</div>
    <br>
    &nbsp;&nbsp;
    <div id='to-be-sized' >right</div><br>
</div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

You can either:

  • use the incomplete but philosophically correct path of pure CSS and face every kind of incompatibility between browsers

or

  • write 3 lines of dirty semantically incorrect and devil made table and have it work perfectly everywhere

Your pick :)

share|improve this answer
    
This answer made me smile=). –  Evan Moran May 9 '13 at 1:54
    
For years and years tables have been hated by so many people, and for year tables have been the only reliable solution to so many problems. The CSS standard has been broken from the very beginning. Such a simple problem should be piece of cake, but it isn't. –  GetFree May 21 '13 at 20:45

I did something similar to KyokoHunter:

$('div.row').each(function(){
     var rowHeight = $(this).innerHeight();
     $(this).children('div.column').css('height',rowHeight);
});

This goes through every row in a div "table" and makes the heights all match, as long as the divs are classed accordingly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.