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I want to create a huge dummy file say 1~2 GBs in matter of seconds. here is what I've written in C# :

file.writeallbytes("filename",new byte[a huge number]);

and another way with indicating the status, was like following :

long FSS = din.TotalFreeSpace;
long segments = FSS / 10000;
long last_seg = FSS % 10000;
BinaryWriter br = new BinaryWriter(fs);

for (long i = 0; i < segments; i++)
{
    br.Write(new byte[10000]);

    this.label2.Text = "segments write :" + i.ToString() + "\r\n" + "segments remain :" + ((segments-i)+1).ToString();
    Application.DoEvents();
}
br.Write(new byte[last_seg]);
this.label2.Text += "\r\nDone!";
br.Close();

where din is Disk Information object

well with these two approach it takes something like 2 or more minutes to write such a big but dummy file. is there any other faster way for doing so?

regards.

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3  
BinaryWriter is for writing POCOs to a file in a format that .NET can read back from, it's not what you'd expect from the name. –  Chris S Dec 10 '09 at 13:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Simply create the file, seek to a suitably large offset, and write a single byte:

FileStream fs = new FileStream(@"c:\tmp\huge_dummy_file", FileMode.CreateNew);
fs.Seek(2048L * 1024 * 1024, SeekOrigin.Begin);
fs.WriteByte(0);
fs.Close();

This will yield a 2GB file with basically unpredictable contents, which should be fine for your purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for an intriguingly simple solution (assuming dummy contents is ok). –  Abel Dec 10 '09 at 13:47
    
it will take same amount of time to write the dummy file into the cool/flash/ram disk (I almost forget to say that I'm using the removable storage). –  austin powers Dec 10 '09 at 14:07
4  
The contents are not unpredictable: the file will be filled with zeros when you do the write. If that wasn't done, it would be a security issue. –  RickNZ Dec 12 '09 at 12:11
2  
@RickNZ: while this will indeed be the case for common file systems, it isn't an explicit part of the API contract, and won't be the case for some third-party network redirectors. –  mdb Dec 12 '09 at 20:01
    
Hahahaha PERFECT!!! :D –  Cipi Jun 24 '11 at 11:29

If you don't care about the contents, then by far the fastest way I know of is this - it is practically instant:

private void CreateDummyFile(string fileName, long length)
{
    using (var fileStream = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None))
    {
        fileStream.SetLength(length);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing using and making mdb's answer even simpler. –  Abel Dec 10 '09 at 13:51
7  
Out of curiosity, tested SetLength and Seek + WriteByte approaches. With Seek it took 15 seconds for 512MB, with just SetLength it took about 1 second. In both cases, even after many tests, the files were filled with NULLs (as opposed to arbitrary data). Not sure if that's a clean disk or some optimized zero-padded create under the hood. –  Abel Dec 10 '09 at 14:06
    
Good spot - very interesting. I can confirm the same on mine; I'd hazard a guess that it is unlikely to be a clean disk in my case (messy and full hard disk!) –  Rob Levine Dec 10 '09 at 14:18
    
for me it takes longer than mdb's approach :-? –  austin powers Dec 10 '09 at 14:24
    
have you tried benchmarking both a several times, deleting the file after each test, to exclude the possible influence of the disk filling up or other factors? –  Rob Levine Dec 10 '09 at 14:29

If you just need a FileStream, you could use FileStream.SetLength. That will get you a stream which is 2 GB long. Then you can write the final byte at an arbitrary position of your choice. But the contents will be undefined.

If you're trying to actually create a file on the disk, yes, you'll need to actually write its contents. And yes, hard disks are going to be slow; something like a 1 GB/min write speed isn't totally ridiculous. Sorry -- that's physics!

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Why did you not use the BackgroundWorker class to achieve this, as you can pass anything into the method ReportProgress to indicate the status report. See the example below:

        private BackgroundWorker bgWorker;
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            bgWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
            bgWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bgWorker_DoWork);
            bgWorker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(bgWorker_ProgressChanged);
            bgWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(bgWorker_RunWorkerCompleted);
            bgWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
        }

        void bgWorker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
           this.label2.Text = "Done";
        }

        void bgWorker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
        {
           MyStatus myProgressStatus = (MyStatus)e.UserState;
           this.label2.Text = string.Format("segments write : {0}" + Environment.Newline + "Segments Remain: {1}", myProgressStatus.iWritten, myProgressStatus.iRemaining);
        }

        void bgWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            long FSS = din.TotalFreeSpace;
                long segments = FSS / 10000;
                long last_seg = FSS % 10000;
                BinaryWriter br = new BinaryWriter(fs);

                for (long i = 0; i < segments; i++)
                {
                    br.Write(new byte[10000]);
bgWorker.ReportProgress(i.ToString(), new MyStatus(i, ((segments-i) + 1)));

                }
                br.Write(new byte[last_seg]);
                br.Close();
        }

public class MyStatus{
   public int iWritten;
   public int iRemaining;
   public MyStatus(int iWrit, int iRem){
     this.iWritten = iWrit;
     this.iRemaining = iRem;
   }
}
}

This is a rough draft... Hope this helps, Best regards, Tom.

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I could be wrong but you will probably find that it's impossible to create a file that large that quickly as there will be a bottleneck in the I/O writing process.

However in your code above the Applciation.DoEvents will be slowing things down. Also any repainting of the screenthis.label2.Text = will cause a slight slow down.

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Recursion: a simple way to create an actual file... (in this example 1GB)

at the command prompt:

echo "This is just a sample line appended to create a big file.. " > dummy.txt

for /L %i in (1,1,24) do type dummy.txt >> dummy.txt

excerpt from: http://www.windows-commandline.com/how-to-create-large-dummy-file/

share|improve this answer
    
The OP asked how to do it in c# –  Rob Levine Jul 15 at 15:11
    
Also since you are writing inside that is not a dummy file, and the suggested Batch solution is very wrong and inefficient, you must use 'FSUtil file createnew' command instead to really create a dummy (EMPTY) file of any size in seconds. –  ElektroStudios Jul 22 at 15:13

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