Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a dynamic array class. I included a copy constructor and operator= function to allow me to assign one array to another. It works when I assign arrays of the same length to one another, but when they have different lengths, I get compiler memory warnings, and/or the code bombs without executing, depending on whether the lefthand array is larger than the right-hand array, and vice versa. I have a function that inserts values to the array, and think that the issue might lie here (note: I had to comment out the memory deletion inside the destructor to get the code going).

class Array
{
    private:
    int * ptr;
    int size; 
    int numElement;

public:
    Array();
    Array(const int*, int);
    Array(const Array&);
    ~Array();
    void setValueAtIndex(int, int);
    void insertValueAtEnd(int ); 
    int getArraySize();
    const Array& operator=(const Array& );  
};

#include "array.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

Array::Array()
{
  size = 10;
  numElement = 0;
  ptr = new int[size];
  for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
  {
    ptr[i] = 0;
  }
}

Array::Array(const int * ptr_, int size_)
{
  size = size_;
  numElement = size;
  ptr = new int[numElement];
  for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
  {
    ptr[i] = ptr_[i];
  }
}

Array::Array(const Array& other)
{
  size = other.size;
  numElement = other.numElement;
  if (other.ptr)
  {    
      ptr = new int[numElement];
      for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
      {
        ptr[i] = other.ptr[i];
      }
      if(!ptr)
      {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
      }
  }
  else ptr = 0;
}

Array::~Array()
{
  if(ptr)
  {
   //delete [] ptr;
   //ptr = 0;
  }
}

void Array::setValueAtIndex(int a, int b)
{
  if(b > size)
  {  
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  ptr[b] = a;
}

void Array::insertValueAtEnd(int insert)
{
  if(numElement == size)
  {
      size++;
  } 
  ptr[size-1] = insert;
  numElement++;
}

int Array::getArraySize()
{
  return size;
}

const Array& Array::operator=(const Array& other)
{    
    if(this != &other)
    {
     if (ptr)
     {
       delete [] ptr;
      ptr = 0;
     }
     numElement = other.numElement;
     size = other.size;
     if(other.ptr)
     {
       ptr = new int[numElement];
       for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
       {
         ptr[i] = other.ptr[i]; 
       }
     }
     else ptr = 0;
    }
    return *this;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your copy constructor has some issues. You're allocating numElement, but the copy loop uses size. Further there's a leak if the array was already allocated. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 15 '13 at 11:40
1  
What testcase causes the crash? – Angus Comber Sep 15 '13 at 11:45
    
please share the main, i couldn't crush it, but it might be something i didn't understand – No Idea For Name Sep 15 '13 at 11:48

There are multiple issues with your code! Starting with a minor one in the copy constructor: if new T[n] fails, it does not return 0. Instead, it throws and exceptions. Thus, your test if (!ptr) will never be reached. In your code it would be too late anyway as you already used the pointer!

The assignment operator is entirely garbled! The use of a self-assignment check is generally a very good indication that the code is not exception safe (if self-assignment genuinely wouldn't work without this check) or that you are optimizing for a rare case (hopefully you don't assign objects to themselves more often than to other objects). In your case the check indicates that the code, if it were working, would not be exception safe: You start off deleting memory which you can't get back if allocating memory fails and throws. The main error probably causing you grief is that you allocate numElements objects (which seems to be the number of elements in your array, not its capacity) but you copy size objects (which seems to be the number of possibly available elements, i.e., numElements < size). As a side note, I strongly recommend you use the same names as the standard C++ library does for its containers, i.e., size() for the number of actual elements and capacity() for the number of elements for which space is reserved.

All that said, the best approach to implementing the assignment operator is to leverage the work already done for the copy constructor and the destructor: these already know how to copy an object and how to get rid of the object. The way to do this looks like this:

Array& Array::operator= (Array other) {
    this->swap(other);
    return *this;
}
void Array::swap(Array& other) {
     std::swap(this->ptr, other.ptr);
     std::swap(this->size, other.size);
     std::swap(this->numElements, other.numElements);
}

This approach requires that there is also a function swap() which can swap two objects of the type. However, it is typically trivial to write: you just std::swap() each of the members.

share|improve this answer
    
How the function swap handle the allocated memory? – BlackMamba Sep 15 '13 at 12:37
    
@BlackMamba: It doesn't need to mess with memory allocation: it just exchanges all members between the two different objects, i.e., it just transfers allocated memory from one object to the other object. The only time this transfer would not work is when the allocation used different stateful allocators but that isn't the case the way the memory is allocated in Array. – Dietmar Kühl Sep 15 '13 at 12:41

Your code breaks using insertValueAtEnd() because it does not grow the size of the underlying array. It crashed for me with this simple test case:

int realarr[] = { 1,2,3};
Array arr1(realarr, 3);
arr1.insertValueAtEnd(7);

You need to check if you have reached capacity (you call it size) and grow underlying storage if so.

I am assuming you are implementing a dynamic array?

Just a style issue you can ignore if you like. It is more common to use name_ as class data members and pass in name as a parameter.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.