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The code below shows a part of my program. I am trying to create an atbash encryption for a small challenge (atbash is an encryption method; example, I type in 'hello' and the program will output 'svool'. It reverses the letter order. More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atbash)

The program works...sort-of, when i type 'abcdef' the program outputs 'zyxwvu'. However, say i wanted to type an actual word. The program won't cycle through the array and will just output "test" (which it's NOT supposed to do). How do I fix this?

char letter1 [] = new char [] {'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z'};
char letter2 [] = new char [] {'z','y','x','w','v','u','t','s','r','q','p','o','n','m','l','k','j','i','h','g','f','e','d','c','b','a'};

      for (int i = 0 ; i < input.length() ; i++)
      {
        if(i == input.length()) {
          break;
        }
        if (input.charAt(i) == letter1[i]) {
          input.setCharAt(i, letter2[i]);
          System.out.println (input);
        }
        else if (input.charAt(i) != letter1[i]){
          System.out.println ("test");

        }
      }
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1  
For each char, you should travel on the whole array. –  Maroun Maroun Sep 15 '13 at 13:16
    
@MarounMaroun you don't have to... –  No Idea For Name Sep 15 '13 at 13:21
    
Actually you don't have need any array. Just calculate difference between your lowercase letter and z like for h: (z-h) and you will get which letter of alphabet you will need use so just add this result to a and h-> z - h + a = 12 + a = 115 which is 's' (after casting 115 to char). –  Pshemo Sep 15 '13 at 13:30

2 Answers 2

You need another loop to match each character of input against all replacement possibilities.

And the part where you break; will never be reached. ;)

char letter1 [] = new char [] {'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z'};
char letter2 [] = new char [] {'z','y','x','w','v','u','t','s','r','q','p','o','n','m','l','k','j','i','h','g','f','e','d','c','b','a'};

for (int i = 0 ; i < input.length() ; i++)
{
  for (int j = 0; j < letter1.length; j++) {
    if (input.charAt(i) == letter1[j]) {
      input.setCharAt(i, letter2[j]);
    }
  }
}

In case you will always want this sort of "translation" (map "a-z" to "z-a") there also is a much simpler way:

for (int i = 0 ; i < input.length() ; i++)
{
   input.setCharAt(i, (char)('z' - (input.charAt(i) - 'a')));
}
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this is just a waste when you know exactly where it is –  No Idea For Name Sep 15 '13 at 13:22
    
true but maybe you wanna change the translation at some point –  olydis Sep 15 '13 at 13:23
    
nope... please take a look at the link he posted –  No Idea For Name Sep 15 '13 at 13:24
    
your answer as well as @NoIdeaForName 's answer are both good answers, thank you –  demiZe Sep 15 '13 at 13:25

I don't think you need elaborate lookups to get Atbash encryption.

Here's a simpler way to do it.

String input = "hello";
StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();

for (char c : input.toCharArray()) {
    char rev = (char)(('z' - c) + 'a');
    output.append(rev);
}

System.out.println(output);

For hello, output is svool

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