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I have a class MyClass that needs data from a file that will be used throughout the run of the program. To read in the data I have another class OpenFileService that derives from IDisposable and uses a BinaryReader to read in all the data:

internal class OpenFileService : IDisposable
{
    #region disposing data
    bool disposed = false;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            br.Dispose();
        }
    }

    ~OpenFileService()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
    #endregion

    internal event EventHandler ErrorInFileReadEventHandler;
    internal event EventHandler SuccessfulFileReadEventHandler;

    private BinaryReader br;

    internal void OpenFile(object obj)
    {
        MyClass sender = obj as MyClass;
        bool isWrongFormat = false;

        try
        {
            br = new BinaryReader(File.Open((sender).fileName, FileMode.Open));
            //read in header from file.
            if (//header shows wrong file format)
            {     
                isWrongFormat = true;
                throw new System.Exception();
            }
            //read rest of file.
            SuccessfulFileReadEventHandler(this,null);
        }
        catch
        {
            if (isWrongFormat)
                MessageBox.Show("Wrong format.");
            else
                MessageBox.Show("Couldn't access.");
            ErrorInFileReadEventHandler(this, null);
            return;
        }
        finally
        {
            this.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

And it is used as such:

class MyClass
{
    internal filePath; //assuming it has already been determined

    internal ImageData(string filePath)
    {
        this.filePath = filePath;
        OpenFileService ofs = new OpenFileService();
        ofs.ErrorInFileReadEventHandler += new EventHandler(UnsuccessfulFileRead);
        ofs.SuccessfulFileReadEventHandler += new EventHandler(SuccessfulFileRead);
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(ofs.OpenFile));
        thread.IsBackground = true;
        thread.Start(this);
    }
}

Now when the file format is wrong and I create the exception myself in the try block, everything works without any problems, but when the file could actually not be accessed (e.g. write-protected) br.Dispose(); creates a NullReferenceException and I cannot figure out why. I really stripped down the code to its bare essentials, I hope it's not too long.

Edit: Possible answer can be found from the accepted answer here as a recommended answer by Microsoft.

share|improve this question
1  
Maybe br stays null because the file is write protected? –  Jacob Sep 15 '13 at 15:19
    
Wow...I actually missed that thought. Replacing br.Dispose(); with if(br != null) br.Dispose(); seems to solve it... Thank's a lot! I can't believe how I didn't think of this. –  phil13131 Sep 15 '13 at 15:22
    
u welcome. can happen to anyone. –  Jacob Sep 15 '13 at 15:26
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue might become clearer if you split your file-open logic across two lines:

try
{
    var fs = File.Open((sender).fileName, FileMode.Open);
    br = new BinaryReader(fs);
}
finally
{
    br.Dispose();
}

When the File.Open call fails, the exception is thrown without anything being assigned to the br field. When you attempt to dispose it in the finally block, it would still be null, thus your exception.

Edit: The way I would suggest fixing this:

try
{
    using (FileStream fs = File.Open(sender.fileName, FileMode.Open))
    using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs))
    {        
        //read in header from file.
        if ( /*header shows wrong file format*/ )
        {     
            isWrongFormat = true;
            MessageBox.Show("Wrong format.");
            ErrorInFileReadEventHandler(this, null);
        }
        else
        {
            //read rest of file.
            SuccessfulFileReadEventHandler(this, null);
        }
    }
}
catch
{
    MessageBox.Show("Couldn't access.");
    ErrorInFileReadEventHandler(this, null);
}

In the process, I've demoted your BinaryReader from a field to a local variable. Since you're only accessing it within the OpenFile method (and disposing it before returning), there's no need for its reference to persist outside the method.

share|improve this answer
    
I accept this answer, because I realized that was the problem after the comment on my question. Thank you for your answer, I will change it. Do I not have to dispose fs as an unmanaged resource? –  phil13131 Sep 15 '13 at 15:26
    
In general, you should dispose of any IDisposable object that you instantiate. However, file-handling wrappers are an (unfortunate) exception. The Dispose method of the BinaryReader class will also close any stream that you passed to its constructor during initialization. So, the short answer is no, you don't have to dispose the file stream as long as you dispose the wrapping BinaryReader. –  Douglas Sep 15 '13 at 15:29
    
Okay, thank you, I had the feeling Microsoft would add an confusing exception to their disposing conventions. –  phil13131 Sep 15 '13 at 15:30
    
Refer to this answer (and ensuing discussion) if you would like an elaboration: Does disposing streamreader close the stream? –  Douglas Sep 15 '13 at 15:33
    
I just realized that your suggested answer might not work. If fs throws the exception, br.Dispose(); will be called without having initialized it. –  phil13131 Sep 15 '13 at 15:34
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