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I'm using C# on Framework 3.5. I'm looking to quickly sort a Generic List<>. For the sake of this example lets say I have a List of a Person type with a property of lastname. How would I sort this List using a lambda expression?

List<Person> people = PopulateList();
people.OrderBy(???? => ?????)
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8 Answers 8

up vote 392 down vote accepted

If you mean an in-place sort (i.e. the list is updated):

people.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.LastName, y.LastName));

If you mean a new list:

var newList = people.OrderBy(x=>x.LastName).ToList(); // ToList optional
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2  
I believe that first one wants to be people.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.LastName, y.LastName) < 0); –  James Curran Oct 9 '08 at 16:56
25  
@James: I wouldn't think so. Comparison<T> returns int, not bool. –  Jon Skeet Oct 9 '08 at 16:59
8  
What Jon said... –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '08 at 17:09
1  
I wonder if you want to OrderBy Firstname and Lastname... what should you write? –  balexandre Apr 16 '09 at 7:03
46  
var newList = people.OrderBy(x=>x.FirstName).ThenBy(x=>x.LastName).ToList(); –  Marc Gravell Apr 16 '09 at 7:36

Do you need the list to be sorted in place, or just an ordered sequence of the contents of the list? The latter is easier:

var peopleInOrder = people.OrderBy(person => person.LastName);

To sort in place, you'd need an IComparer<Person> or a Comparison<Person>. For that, you may wish to consider ProjectionComparer in MiscUtil.

(I know I keep bringing MiscUtil up - it just keeps being relevant...)

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people.OrderBy(person => person.lastname).ToList();
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9  
Well, that still doesn't capture the result - you'd need a "List<Person> people = " on the left hand side... –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '08 at 17:10

you can use linq :) using :

System.linq;
var newList = people.OrderBy(x=>x.Name).ToList();
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private void SortGridGenerico< T >(
          ref List< T > lista       
    , SortDirection sort
    , string propriedadeAOrdenar)
{

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(propriedadeAOrdenar)
    && lista != null
    && lista.Count > 0)
    {

        Type t = lista[0].GetType();

        if (sort == SortDirection.Ascending)
        {

            lista = lista.OrderBy(
                a => t.InvokeMember(
                    propriedadeAOrdenar
                    , System.Reflection.BindingFlags.GetProperty
                    , null
                    , a
                    , null
                )
            ).ToList();
        }
        else
        {
            lista = lista.OrderByDescending(
                a => t.InvokeMember(
                    propriedadeAOrdenar
                    , System.Reflection.BindingFlags.GetProperty
                    , null
                    , a
                    , null
                )
            ).ToList();
        }
    }
}
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for me this useful dummy guide - Sorting in Generic List - worked. it helps you to understand 4 ways(overloads) to do this job with very complete and clear explanations and simple examples

  • List.Sort ()
  • List.Sort (Generic Comparison)
  • List.Sort (Generic IComparer)
  • List.Sort (Int32, Int32, Generic IComparer)
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You can use this code snippet:

var New1 = EmpList.OrderBy(z => z.Age).ToList();

where New1 is a List<Employee>.

EmpList is variable of a List<Employee>.

z is a variable of Employee type.

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That was a good one. –  Milind Thakkar Apr 1 '13 at 13:48
    
AnshuMan, there is nothing like a var type. New1 is List<Employee> and z is Employee. –  nawfal May 30 '13 at 9:05

This is a generic sorter. Called with the switch below.

dvm.PagePermissions is a property on my ViewModel of type List T in this case T is a EF6 model class called page_permission.

dvm.UserNameSortDir is a string property on the viewmodel that holds the next sort direction. The one that is actaully used in the view.

switch (sortColumn)
{
    case "user_name":
        dvm.PagePermissions = Sort(dvm.PagePermissions, p => p.user_name, ref sortDir);
        dvm.UserNameSortDir = sortDir;
        break;
    case "role_name":
        dvm.PagePermissions = Sort(dvm.PagePermissions, p => p.role_name, ref sortDir);
        dvm.RoleNameSortDir = sortDir;
        break;
    case "page_name":
        dvm.PagePermissions = Sort(dvm.PagePermissions, p => p.page_name, ref sortDir);
        dvm.PageNameSortDir = sortDir;
        break;
}                 


public List<T> Sort<T,TKey>(List<T> list, Func<T, TKey> sorter, ref string direction)
    {
        if (direction == "asc")
        {
            list = list.OrderBy(sorter).ToList();
            direction = "desc";
        }
        else
        {
            list = list.OrderByDescending(sorter).ToList();
            direction = "asc";
        }
        return list;
    }
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I think that this is way too complicated. As you can see in the other answers, it can all be done in one single line (it doesn't necessarily mean that doing it in a single line is good, but I don't get the advantage of doing it like this) –  jalgames Jul 19 at 21:29
    
This is for multi column sorting using AngularJS. It is essentially the single line sorting but it also sets the sort diretion variable. Its really not that complex if you look at it closely. I guess the Sort function is a little intimidating with all the generic stuff but if I took that definition out it is a 1 line Sort call. –  howserss Aug 8 at 14:23

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