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I'm new to unix. I'm trying to sort a file by the occurence of values in a certain column in it:

IP    - - Website
1.1.1 - - stackoverflow.com
0.0.5 - - a.com 
1.1.1 - - google.com

expected result:

IP    - - Website
1.1.1 - - stackoverflow.com
0.0.5 - - a.com

I tried different methods:

  • sort -k1 | uniq -c (didn't work because uniq checks the whole line, including websites)
  • using sort -u -t- -k1

Can anyone help me, or at least tell me what I'm doing wrong please?

EDIT: I found a better way to do this: egrep -o '[[:digits:]]{1,3}.[[:digits:]]{1,3}.[[:digits:]]{1,3}'|sort -g | uniq -c | sort -gr (hope this will help someone one day)

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1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. How often do you use 3-part dotted decimal IP addresses? Do you want the data associated with the first row, the last row, or the 'maximum' row (last name sorted alphabetically) or the 'minimum' row or does it not matter which row. What are the criteria for ordering 1.1.1 before 0.0.5? Why is the header line still at the top (they're a pain to deal with, in general — which is why many Unix commands do not generate them). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '13 at 17:15
    
Actually I gave only an example. What I want is to sort the IP from most occurrent to least occurrent in a file that has the same structure of my example. Sorry I wasn't clear enough in my question. –  user2563597 Sep 15 '13 at 19:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can give an opportunity to . It split line in two fields based in those - in the middle, and saves content in a hash to sort them later. In the hash, the key is the IP and the value is an array-ref with the counter of each IP appearance and the original line.

Assuming infile with content:

IP    - - Website
2.2.2 - - yahoo.es
1.1.1 - - in.google.com
0.0.5 - - a.com 
1.1.1 - - google.com
1.1.1 - - gmail.google.com
2.2.2 - - yahoo.com

And following perl command:

perl -lne '
    do { $header = $_; next } if $. == 1;
    my @f = split /\s+-\s+-\s+/;
    if ( ! exists $ips{ $f[0] } ) {
        $ips{ $f[0] } = [ 1, $_ ];
    }
    else {
        $ips{ $f[0] }[0] += 1;
    }
    END {
        printf qq|%s\n|, $header;
        for my $key ( sort { $ips{ $b }[0] <=> $ips{ $a }[0] } keys %ips ) {
            printf qq|%s\n|, $ips{ $key }[1];
        }
    }
' infile

It yields:

IP    - - Website
1.1.1 - - in.google.com
2.2.2 - - yahoo.es
0.0.5 - - a.com
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Thanks for this clear answer. This would do the work, but is there a shorter way to do it? –  user2563597 Sep 15 '13 at 19:23
    
@user2563597: Shorter in which terms? –  Birei Sep 15 '13 at 19:37
    
By using simple commands such as sort, uniq (not writing a code)? Thanks –  user2563597 Sep 15 '13 at 19:43
    
I used perl because it's more powerful to handle the increased complexity to work with a header or a counter of IPs. This is a one-liner that you can use as an alias or put it inside a shell script. If you don't like perl and want only sort, then my answer is no, I don't know how to do it only with sort + uniq combo, but it doesn't mean that is not posible. Simply my skill is not good enought. –  Birei Sep 15 '13 at 19:56
1  
You could simplify the Perl slightly by using do { print; next; } if $. == 1; and then omit printing $header later. You could simplify the if/else into: $ips{$f[0]} //= [ 0, $_ ]; $ips{$f[0]}[0]++; (2 lines instead of 6). You could use -a and -F'\s+-\s+-\s+' to auto-split into @F, with corresponding changes throughout. But you did a nice job. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '13 at 20:02

It seem you are asking to remove any line with duplicate first fields. This can be achieved with the following awk one line:

$ awk '!a[$1]++' file
IP    - - Website
1.1.1 - - stackoverflow.com
0.0.5 - - a.com
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This still doesn't do anything to sort by occurrence count. –  tripleee Sep 15 '13 at 17:10
    
@tripleee maybe you can explain better what the OP want as it's not clear to me, I described what I thought the OP wanted and the expected output matches... –  iiSeymour Sep 15 '13 at 17:14
    
Looks like @Birei understood it the same way I did. I agree the OP's example could be better. –  tripleee Sep 15 '13 at 17:26

Simple shell solution...

egrep -o '^[0-9\.]+' myfile.txt | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
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uniq can ignore the rest of lines after a specified number of characters with -w.

sort -r -k1 file | uniq -w5

uniq -w is not POSIX, but if you happen to be on a fairly up-to-date Linux, it should work.

Next I was informed that the first fields, unlike the vertically aligned example, are variable length. Should have known, it's an IP address, stupid! :) In that case I add 8 spaces after the IP address to compensate for the difference between the shortest (7) and longest (15) variants, tell uniq to disregard the 1st 15 chars, then compress the the remaining whitespaces to 1 again

sort -r -k1 file | sed 's/ /         /' | uniq -w15 | sed 's/  */ /'

No Perl.

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I don't think this is portable to POSIX. Which systems support this? –  tripleee Sep 15 '13 at 16:27
    
Anyway, this doesn't solve the "sort by occurrences of the key field" requirement. –  tripleee Sep 15 '13 at 16:28
    
sort (GNU coreutils) 8.13 on Debian Wheezy. –  SzG Sep 15 '13 at 16:30
    
Actually the problem is with uniq -w5 : I don't the length of the IP, it's different each time –  user2563597 Sep 15 '13 at 19:25

You can accomplish it by throwing sed into the equation.

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Could you please give me further explanation? I read the documentation, but I can't see how to use it in my case –  user2563597 Sep 15 '13 at 16:18
    
Why not tell sort to ignore the websites?.. sed is POSIX compliant and can be used to format the file to ignore the websites, prior to sorting. –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Sep 15 '13 at 16:31

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